Environmental Regulations and Corporate Strategy: A NAFTA Perspective

By Alan Rugman; John Kirton et al. | Go to book overview

Preface and Acknowledgements

This book is the result of an intense collaboration among three scholars from several core public policy disciplines: Alan Rugman of management studies and economics; John Kirton of political science and international relations; and Julie Soloway of law and regulation. Our collaboration had its origins in our shared research interest arising from earlier work related to trade-environment issues. Alan Rugman's was inspired by his analyses of how protectionist firms in the United States captured the administration of the antidumping and countervailing duty process to deny Canadian firms the entry they needed to the market on which their corporate fortunes depended. John Kirton's arose from his study of the role of international institutions in the management of the Canada-US relationship and of how environmental considerations could best be inserted into the free trade agreements--NAFTA, the WTO, APEC, and the FTAA--that Canada, the United States, and Mexico were negotiating in the 1990s. Julie Soloway's emerged from her analysis of NAFTA's environmental effects and the quality of dispute settlement under international trade law within NAFTA and the WTO.

In all cases our scholarly interest was reinforced by our role as advisers to firms, governments, and international organizations on how managers and policymakers could act more effectively to meet the challenges of a rapidly changing world. Kirton and Rugman served as successive members of the government of Canada's International Trade Advisory Committee during the time the Canada-US Free Trade Agreement and NAFTA were being negotiated and implemented. They worked with Soloway on three major projects for the NAFTA Commission for Environmental Cooperation. Rugman and Kirton acted as consultants for major North American and international corporations, adding a sensitivity to the practical, policy-oriented implications of their analysis for business, government, and NGO practitioners.

These interests led us to initiate, in April of 1997, a three-year project on 'Trade, Environmental Regulations and Canadian Competitiveness', with the financial support of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, through their programme on 'Managing for Global Competitiveness'. To assist this project we assembled an advisory group of senior individuals from the business, government, and NGO sectors: John Howard, Senior Vice- President, MacMillan Bloedel; David Winfield, Senior Vice-President, Northern Telecom; Someshwar Rao, Director, Industry Canada; Sarah Richardson, Trade-Environment Program Manager, Commission for Environmental Cooperation; Michael Cloghesy, Centre Patronal de l'Énvironnement du Quebec; and Ken Ogilvie, Executive Director, Pollution Probe. We are grateful to the SSHRC for their indispensable financial support under award 804-97-0005

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Environmental Regulations and Corporate Strategy: A NAFTA Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 262

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.