Some Joe You Don't Know: An American Biographical Guide to 100 British Television Personalities

By Anthony Slide | Go to book overview

C

CHERYL CAMPBELL

A talented actress of stage and television, Cheryl Campbell has starred in several productions that have had an impact in the United States, notably Pennies from Heaven and Testament of Youth. Her face is always vaguely and pleasantly familiar but her name remains virtually unknown. As Campbell told TV Guide ( February 14, 1981), "You can play roles for 20 years on the BBC and no one will know your name. In America, it seems that actors are sold as themselves. There's some pressure in England to do talk and quiz shows, but I'd rather play somebody else and get paid for doing it."

Born into a middle-class family in Welwyn Garden City, close enough to London to be a dormitory suburb and not as attractive as its name implies, Cheryl Campbell studied at the London Academy of Dramatic Art and graduated in 1972. She joined the National Theatre Company in 1975, and the following year she had a small role, as Frida Foldal, in John Gabriel Borkman, which gave her the opportunity to work with Sir Ralph Richardson. Her stage performances have generally been with the National Theatre or the Royal Shakespeare Company, but she has also worked in repertory with the Birmingham Repertory Company and the Citizens Theatre in Glasgow. In recent years, Campbell has starred in Betrayal ( 1991), Macbeth ( 1993, as Lady Macbeth), and Misha's Party ( 1993).

Cheryl Campbell's screen roles have been few, and limited to the early 1980s, but all have been prominent parts: Hawk--The Slayer ( 1980), McVicar ( 1980), Chariots of Fire ( 1981), Greystoke, the Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes ( 1984), and The Shooting Party ( 1984).

American television viewers first saw Cheryl Campbell as Sarah Bernhardt in London Weekend Television's production of Lillie, in which Francesca Annis starred as Lillie Langtry, and which was aired on MasterpieceTheatre

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Some Joe You Don't Know: An American Biographical Guide to 100 British Television Personalities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 39
  • D 55
  • E 59
  • F 67
  • G 75
  • H 85
  • Bibliography 117
  • I 121
  • J 123
  • K 141
  • L 147
  • M 161
  • Bibliography 181
  • O 191
  • P 193
  • R 203
  • Bibliography 232
  • T 235
  • W 243
  • General Bibliography 257
  • Index 259
  • About the Author 273
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