Some Joe You Don't Know: An American Biographical Guide to 100 British Television Personalities

By Anthony Slide | Go to book overview

E

PAUL EDDINGTON

Paul Eddington is an actor who makes situation comedy work seem such a breeze. He is the perfect foil to anyone, from Penelope Keith to Nigel Hawthorne. Often he remains quietly in the background, the secondary figure in the production, but it is his performance that often holds the show together. His strength is not in playing a flashy part but rather a crucial one.

Born in London on June 18, 1927, Paul Eddington got his initial stage training with the wartime Entertainments National Service Association (better known as ENSA) from 1944 to 1945, and he later studied in 1951 at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. With ENSA, Eddington made his stage debut at the Garrison Theatre, Colchester, in Jeannie, in 1944. He made his London stage debut many years later, in 1961, as the Rabbi in The Tenth Man at the Comedy Theatre. Three years later, Eddington made his New York stage debut as Palmer Anderson in A Severed Head at the Royale Theatre. Among the plays in which Eddington has appeared are Jorrocks ( 1966), Queenie ( 1967), Forty Years On ( 1968), Donkey's Years ( 1977), Ten Times Table ( 1978), Middle-Age-Spread ( 1979), Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? ( 1981), Noises Off ( 1982), Forty Years On ( 1984), Jumpers ( 1985), The Browning Version ( 1988), London Assurance ( 1989), Tartuffe ( 1991), and No Man's Land ( 1992). In 1994 he appeared at Wyndham's Theatre, opposite Richard Briers, his costar from The Good Life in a revival of David Storey Home.

For his work in Harold Pinter No Man's Land--in The Guardian ( February 10, 1993), Michael Billington described it as "a marvelous performance"--Eddington received the London Drama Critics Award for Best Actor.

Paul Eddington's films have been few and his roles minor: Jet Storm

-59-

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Some Joe You Don't Know: An American Biographical Guide to 100 British Television Personalities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 39
  • D 55
  • E 59
  • F 67
  • G 75
  • H 85
  • Bibliography 117
  • I 121
  • J 123
  • K 141
  • L 147
  • M 161
  • Bibliography 181
  • O 191
  • P 193
  • R 203
  • Bibliography 232
  • T 235
  • W 243
  • General Bibliography 257
  • Index 259
  • About the Author 273
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