Some Joe You Don't Know: An American Biographical Guide to 100 British Television Personalities

By Anthony Slide | Go to book overview

K

PENELOPE KEITH

One of those uniquely British actresses who are almost parodies of the characters they portray, Penelope Keith has become a firm favorite with American television viewers; her hawklike features and dominating personality typify the English upper classes and upper middle-class suburban bourgeoisie. She is both comic and frightening in her determination to achieve whatever is today's goal, no matter the cost to those around her or her own well-being. She is the woman who expects service in a supermarket, who lives by her own standards, firmly rooted in British triumphs of the past. The Penelope Keith character is eccentric, but there is no madness to her behavior, as in, say, a character created by Margaret Rutherford. There is method to all that the character does--and a scheme that may have been hatched long, long ago.

Penelope Keith belongs to an old tradition of acting; her stage appearances are rooted in Edwardian theater rather than in kitchen sink dramas and all that followed that genre. And just as she is a part of an earlier school of acting, she upholds a tradition of good manners in her personal dealings. Penelope Keith does not mumble her lines; her enunciation is always clear and precise, and, as one critic noted, "her voice does her will." A modern approach to acting, a concern for realism, is not for Penelope Keith. As she once explained, "Acting is artificial. It was a terrible mistake to tell people [in drama schools] that they didn't need to get rid of their regional accents. It did them a disservice; it limited them. One so often hears what I would call ugly voices--inexpressive. You can, though, just about play Shakespeare without the voice, but not Shaw. His prose is so dense that you have to point it. You can't do that without the equipment."

To read Keith's comments on acting is almost to hear again Mrs. Patrick Campbell on the subject of a beautiful voice. Both were obviously of the

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Some Joe You Don't Know: An American Biographical Guide to 100 British Television Personalities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 39
  • D 55
  • E 59
  • F 67
  • G 75
  • H 85
  • Bibliography 117
  • I 121
  • J 123
  • K 141
  • L 147
  • M 161
  • Bibliography 181
  • O 191
  • P 193
  • R 203
  • Bibliography 232
  • T 235
  • W 243
  • General Bibliography 257
  • Index 259
  • About the Author 273
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 278

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.