Some Joe You Don't Know: An American Biographical Guide to 100 British Television Personalities

By Anthony Slide | Go to book overview

O

IAN OGILVY

Ian Ogilvy is one of the most beautiful-looking actors to come out of Britain in the past thirty years. The six-foot actor with grey-blue eyes and brown hair has been described as "intolerably handsome," and this "pretty boy" appearance has proved both a help and a hinderance in his career-- and in later years, primarily the latter. Born into a well-to-do family in Woking, Surrey, on September 30, 1943, Ogilvy attended Eton, where he decided to become both a rock musician and an actor. He worked as an assistant stage manager at London's Royal Court Theatre prior to studying at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art.

In 1958 Ogilvy appeared in Carrion, an amateur film made by Michael Reeves, and subsequently he appeared in all of the director's films, including the cult classic Witchfinder General/The Conqueror Worm ( 1968), until Reeves's death from a drug overdose at the age of twenty-four in 1968. Michael Reeves was noted for his horror films, and that appears to be a genre that has fascinated Ogilvy based on a listing of his features: The She- Beast ( 1966), The Day the Fish Came Out ( 1967), Wuthering Heights ( 1970), And Now the Screaming Starts ( 1973), No Sex Please, We're British ( 1973), and From beyond the Grave ( 1973).

Ian Ogilvy gave some memorable television performances in the 1970s, notably as Elizabeth Bellamy's poet-husband, Laurence, in the second season of Upstairs, Downstairs ( London Weekend Television, 1972- 1973) and as Drusus in I, Claudius ( BBC, 1976). The big break was supposed to come in 1978, when ITC announced it would film a new series, The Return of the Saint, reintroducing the character of Simon Templar, created by Leslie Charteris, which Roger Moore had played on television from 1962 to 1969. The new series cost a reported six million dollars and was filmed exclusively in the United Kingdom except for nine episodes shot in Italy.

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Some Joe You Don't Know: An American Biographical Guide to 100 British Television Personalities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 39
  • D 55
  • E 59
  • F 67
  • G 75
  • H 85
  • Bibliography 117
  • I 121
  • J 123
  • K 141
  • L 147
  • M 161
  • Bibliography 181
  • O 191
  • P 193
  • R 203
  • Bibliography 232
  • T 235
  • W 243
  • General Bibliography 257
  • Index 259
  • About the Author 273
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