Some Joe You Don't Know: An American Biographical Guide to 100 British Television Personalities

By Anthony Slide | Go to book overview

become different people. And in becoming a different person, with all their vulnerabilities, you can either pretend and be unaffected by what you do-- and there are many famous and respected actors who do that--or you can experience what that person feels. The latter is what I do. I'm not saying it's better or worse. But that's the only way I can be."

David Suchet--whose last name is pronounced "Soo-Shay"--was born in London on May 2, 1946, and studied at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts after joining the National Youth Theatre as a teenager. He began his professional career as an assistant stage manager with the Chester Repertory Theatre, and in 1973 he joined the Royal Shakespeare Company, appearing in Romeo and Juliet, As You Like It, The Taming of the Shrew, King Lear, Cymbeline, and Richard II. With the Royal Shakespeare Company, he came to the United States, where he appeared at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and, with a few intermissions, he remained with the company throughout the 1970s.

The actor appeared in his own one-man show, The Kreutzer Sonata, at London's Royal Court Theatre in 1977 and 1978. Later decades have been spent in film and television, but Suchet was memorable in David Mamet Oleanna in 1993. He began his film career as Barsad, something of a favorite character in Norman Rosemont 1978 production of A Tale of Two Cities. Suchet's other films include The Missionary ( 1982), Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes ( 1984), The Little Drummer Girl ( 1984), The Falcon and the Snowman ( 1985), Iron Eagle ( 1986), Harry and the Hendersons ( 1987), and A World Apart ( 1988). He is married to actress Sheila Ferris.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

King Susan. "Poirot Plus More." Los Angeles TV Times, November 15, 1992, p. 87.

Leech Michael. "Touché, Monsieur Suchet." Plays and Players, June 1985, pp. 16-17.

O'Hagan Simon. "Buttoned-up No Longer." The Independent on Sunday, October 9, 1994, p. 23.

Palmer Scott. The Films of Agatha Christie. London: B. T. Batsford, 1993.


MOLLIE SUGDEN

When the BBC first began airing Are You Being Served? on March 14, 1973, it starred Trevor Bannister, but it quickly became apparent that the dominant members of the cast were John Inman, among the men, and, on the distaff side, Mollie Sugden. As Mrs. Slocombe, head of ladies' intimate apparel, Mollie Sugden sported different colored hair on each program. Initially, her own hair was dyed. As it became harder to wash the dye out and when her two children objected to being picked up from school by a mother whose hair might be blue one week and green the next, she began to wear a wig. "There was a time when I was outdone by the punks, but

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Some Joe You Don't Know: An American Biographical Guide to 100 British Television Personalities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 39
  • D 55
  • E 59
  • F 67
  • G 75
  • H 85
  • Bibliography 117
  • I 121
  • J 123
  • K 141
  • L 147
  • M 161
  • Bibliography 181
  • O 191
  • P 193
  • R 203
  • Bibliography 232
  • T 235
  • W 243
  • General Bibliography 257
  • Index 259
  • About the Author 273
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