Critical Ideas in Television Studies

By John Corner | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

MY FIRST DEBT OF THANKS is to the editors of this Oxford series, Charlotte Brunsdon and John Caughie. Their detailed comments and suggestions on draft material helped me greatly both in the organization of the book and the development of its chapters. I would also like to acknowledge my immediate colleagues at Liverpool University, with whom I have discussed aspects of television over several years, sometimes in the course of working alongside them in teaching and research: Neil Gavin, Peter Goddard, Julia Hallam, Len Masterman, Kay Richardson, and Maggie Scammell. Conversations with a much broader range of colleagues at institutions both in Britain and abroad have shaped my thinking about themes and approaches in the study of television. Here, I would like to mention particularly my editorial colleagues on the journal Media, Culture and Society ( Raymond Boyle, Nicholas Garnham, Anna Reading, Paddy Scannell, Philip Schlesinger, Colin Sparks, and Nancy Wood), Sylvia Harvey of Sheffield Hallam University, and Peter Dahlgren of the University of Lund, Sweden.

Mick Belson at Oxford has handled the progress of the manuscript with courtesy and promptness, for which I am very grateful.

J.C.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Critical Ideas in Television Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - Introduction: Research and Criticism 1
  • 2 - Institution 12
  • 3 - Image 24
  • 4 - Talk 37
  • 5 - Narrative 47
  • 6 - Flow 60
  • 7 - Production 70
  • 8 - Reception 80
  • 9 - Pleasure 93
  • 10 - Knowledge 108
  • 11 - Television 2000: The Terms of Transformation 120
  • References 129
  • Index 137
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 146

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.