Arithmetic and Combinatorics: Kant and His Contemporaries

By Gottfried Martin; Judy Wubnig | Go to book overview

Translator's Preface

THIS IS A TRANSLATION of Gottfried Martin Arithmetik und Kombinatorik bei Kant, a 1972 edition of the unrevised 1938 edition, with an added chapter VI, "Synthetic Judgment in Arithmetic."

The 1938 edition included a Lebenslauf (brief autobiography) of Gottfried Martin. The following more up-to-date biography by his wife, Edda Martin, is included here instead.

Gottfried Martin was born on 19 June 1901 in Gera in Thuringia, the son of the minister Wilhelm Martin. He grew up in Heringen in Hessen and attended the public elementary school there; from his thirteenth year he attended the famous Friedrich Gymnasium in Kassel. He passed the matriculation exam in 1919. In 1921, after working two years in a chemical factory in Bet tenhausen near Kassel, he started his studies in chemistry at the University of Marburg. Under the strong influence of Paul Natorp, he soon changed to the study of philosophy. He completed his studies in chemistry, physics, mathematics, and philosophy with Professors Karl Friedrich von Auwers, Clemens Schäfer, Kurt W. S. Hensel, Ernst Zermelo, and Martin Heidegger.

He was drafted into military service in 1939 and discharged in 1943. Nevertheless, he did his habilitation during the war in Cologne with Professor Heinz Heimsoeth. Because of the heavy bombing of Cologne, he had to leave the city and began lecturing in Jena in Thuringia. After the division of Germany, he and his family fled from the Russian occupation to West Germany and back to Cologne. He received offers to go to Tübingen, Munich, Hamburg and Bonn, and went to Bonn as the successor to Professor Erich Rothacker. He held the chair there as professor ordinarius from 1958 until his retirement in 1969. He died 20 October 1972.1

Until his death Martin was the editor of Kant-Studien, which he had started up again with Paul Menzer in 1953 after the lapse between 1945 to 1952; of the general Kant index from 1964; of the Leibniz index from 1968; and coeditor of

-xi-

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Arithmetic and Combinatorics: Kant and His Contemporaries
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Translator's Preface xi
  • Preface [1938] xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter One - The Axiomatics and Logic of Mathematics 3
  • Chapter Two - The Analytic Principles 11
  • Chapter Three - The Axioms of Arithmetic 34
  • Part II 51
  • Chapter Four - Problems About Classes of Numbers 53
  • Chapter Five - Combinatorics and the Idea of A Systematic Ontology 59
  • Chapter Six - Synthetic Judgment in Arithmetic 85
  • Appendix - Examination of Kant's "Critique of Pure Reason," Part I, Section 4 129
  • Notes 141
  • Bibliography 165
  • Name Index 185
  • Subject Index 191
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