Selective Exposure to Communication

By Dolf Henry Zillmann; Jennings P. Bryant | Go to book overview

dispositions toward certain kinds of programming are not constant across all viewers. How people think or feel about programs or the extent to which the audience flows toward or across certain programs or program types varies between demographic divisions of the population. More significantly, however, are those findings that indicate differences in viewing patterns or attitudinal preferences for programs associated with enduring psychological characteristics of viewers. Although much more work still needs to be done to clarify and test the reliability of these findings, early indications are that this line of research is well worth pursuing. It could prove to be work of no small practical worth to broadcast institutions, who in the face of the ever more fragmenting audiences, need to understand better why audiences behave in the ways they do. Then, from both an academic and social policy standpoint, understanding why audiences flow toward programs in different ways could contribute significantly to a better understanding of the effects of television, research on which in the past has all too often ignored how people watch television. Unless we can be clear on this last point, we can never hope to demonstrate properly the extent to which television influences the way people think, feel, and behave.


REFERENCES

Atkin, C., Greenberg, B., Korzenny, F., & McDermott, S. ( 1979). "Selective exposure to televised violence". Journal of Broadcasting, 23, 5-13.

Banks, S. ( 1967). "Patterns of daytime viewing behaviour; Marketing for tomorrow . . . today". Proceedings June 1967 Conference, Chicago: American Marketing Association, 1967, pp. 139- 142.

Barwise, T. P., Ehrenberg, A. S.C., & Goodhardt, G. J. ( 1982). "Glued to the box? Patterns of TV repeat-viewing". Journal of Communication, 32, 22-29.

Bem, S. C. ( 1974). "The measurement of psychological androgyny". Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 52, 155-162.

Boyanowsky, E. O. ( 1977). "Film preferences under condition of threat: Wetting the appetite for violence, information or excitement?" Communication Research, 4, 133-144.

Boyanowsky, E. O., Newtson, D., & Walster, E. ( 1974). "Film preferences following a murder". Communication Research, 1, 32-43.

Buss, A. H., & Durkee, A. ( 1957). "An inventory for assessing different kinds of hostility". Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21, 343-349.

Chaffee, S. ( 1972). "Television and adolescent aggressiveness". In G. Comstock & E. A. Rubinstein (Eds.), T elevision and social behavior: Vol. 3. Television and adolescent aggressiveness (pp. 1- 34). Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Comisky, P., & Bryant, J. ( 1982). "Factors involved in generating suspense". Human Communication and Research, 9, 49-58.

Diener, E., & De D. Four ( 1978). "Does television violence enhance programme popularity?" Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 36, 333-341.

Diener, E., & Woody, L. W. ( 1981). "TV violence and viewing liking". Communication Research, 8, 281-306.

Doob, A. N., & MacDonald, C. E. ( 1979). "Television viewing and fear of victimization: Is the relationship causal?" Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 37, 170-179.

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Selective Exposure to Communication
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Contributors ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Selective-Exposure Phenomena 1
  • 2 - Cognitive Dissonance in Selective Exposure 11
  • References 31
  • 3 - Measuring Exposure to Television 35
  • References 58
  • 4 - Informational Utility and Selective Exposure to Entertainment Media 63
  • References 88
  • 5 - Determinants of Television Viewing Preferences 93
  • References 110
  • 6 - Thought and Action as Determinants of Media Exposure 113
  • References 136
  • 7 - Fear of Victimization and the Appeal of Crime Drama 141
  • References 154
  • 8 - Affect, Mood, and Emotion as Determinants of Selective Exposure 157
  • References 187
  • 9 - Selective Exposure to Educational Television 191
  • References 200
  • 10 - Cable and Program Choice 203
  • References 223
  • 11 - "Play It Again, Sam": Repeated Exposure to Television Programs 225
  • Acknowledgment 241
  • Author Index 243
  • Subject Index 249
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