Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview
range of 10-45. The equipment mimicked a future, target device suite that has two goals. (i) Separate audio functions such as conversations and audio alerts from applications' visual user interface. Audio functions would be delivered via a very small "earplug" speaker and microphone that would remain in the ear at all times. Visual UI would be on a separate, wearable, web-based controller device with a flexible display and application-specific user interface. Separating these functions facilitates compactness and permits use of audio as an "always-available" channel. (ii) Utilize the audio channel to provide highly informative alerts about calls, messages, alarms and other events. The aim of these informative alerts is to provide users with sufficient information with which to decide to engage in conversation or listen to message content.To mimic this target with existing devices and services, the study used a:
Motorola StarTAC® cellular telephone configured to ringless, auto-answer plugged into the author's ear with a Motorola "hands-free" headset and worn on a chain around the authors neck.
PalmPilot® PDA with Novatel Minstrel® CDPD Modem, Unwired Planet® - Browser and AT&T Pocketnet® Service - to display a "live" personal addressbook application that could call or conference entries by tapping a name.
Prototype Telephony Server Software- that served a "front-end" function for all calls and messages coming to the author. Calls [and email] were announced with a voice clip from the caller [or synthetic speech] with callers name and, often, a subject in place of, e.g. an uninformative "ring". Calls and message content were accepted by saying "yes." Deferred calls were sent to a voice messaging system.

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