Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Supporting Collaborative Information Activities in Networked Communities
Natalie Glance1, Antonietta Grasso1, Uwe M. Borghoff2, Dave Snowdon1, Jutta Willamowskil1 1 Xerox Research Centre Europe, Grenoble, France 2 Universität der Bundeswehr München, GermanyOver the years, computer scientists have primarily studied the information discovery process as a single user activity. For example, the research field of information retrieval has provided us with sophisticated techniques for supporting the search process, but mostly in the context of a single, isolated user's interaction with an information base. The recent surge of interest in Knowledge Management, however, has contributed to enlarging the view on processes involving information discovery, sharing and reuse. Recent research now focuses as well on their cooperative aspects and methods for supporting these.In particular, a number of case studies have studied the cooperative nature of information search activities. Notably, the case study reported in [7, 8] provides insight into the forms of cooperation that can take place during a search process.Four basic modes of cooperation were identified:
Sharing of results among members of a team or community.
Self-initiated broadcast by one individual of interesting information encountered in search results.
Member(s) of the team or community act as consultants.
Archival of information judged potentially useful by group members into a group repository.

More evidence of cooperative aspects comes from the work of Twidale at al. [3,8] who have studied in depth the kinds of collaboration that can occur in either the physical or digital library. They have proposed a typology of the cooperative search activities that could benefit from computer support,

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