Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Synchronous, Dynamic Derivative Generation in Computer-supported Meetings

Gitesh K. Raikundalia SoMIT, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, NSW 2457, Australia


1 Introduction

Many text-based meeting tools generate transcripts, or logs, of discussion carried out in a computer-supported meeting. Verbatim textual logs are a useful record of discussion and associated meeting characteristics, such as timestamps of remarks. Logs are a useful reference for reviewing discussion in other meetings. Unfortunately, log files can be highly detailed, and their structure is not the most readable and usable by humans.

Derivatives are meeting documents derived directly from the original raw logs. The content of a derivative is the output of a textual analysis of the log. The analysis is a "massaging" of log data into a more applicable form for use during meeting processes. For example, grouping all remarks according to the participants who made them in order to facilitate location of remarks of a given participant. Derivatives also provide additional features such as presentation of discussion according to corresponding agenda items and facilitating hypertextual navigation of the derivative.

A Web Electronic Meeting Document Manager (WEMDM) is a World Wide Web tool performing several document management functions such as minutes creation. Logan is a WEMDM developed from this research. Logan contains a document generation engine for dynamically and synchronously generating derivatives for use in a computer-supported meeting. Derivatives are used to enhance meeting discussion by providing details in a relevant manner or assist in meeting processes such as minutes creation. In the latter case, a verbatim minutes derivative assists the development of minutes by providing analysed discussion in a navigable form where remarks are quick and easy to access. Locating and understanding discussion is improved, thereby facilitating the derivation of minutes content.

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