Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

4 Discussion

Those participating in the meeting as mobile users were impressed by the ability to look in which ever direction they wished using the HMD. Observations of the mobile users showed them changing their head positions to focus on a person in the remote meeting room in the same manner as they would in a normal meeting room environment. The system as it presently exists has a number of both technical and perceptional problems, partially caused by the software, the camera system chosen and general weaknesses in the system.

Figure 1 (a) shows the meeting room with the omni directional camera lying on some books (b) Shows the remote user with the Head Mounted Display.

The software was developed internally and provides a full screen picture for the HMD at the expense of resolution. The resolution was sufficiently poor so that the average mobile user had difficulties in recognising people beyond a distance of approximately 2 meters. The frame rate was also very slow, especially when users changed their head position quickly. This was due to the video images been transmitted without compression. While we have developed compression algorithms, these were not working with the software at the time of these tests.

A number of communication and perceptual problems occurred. One mobile user complained that the original position of the camera, positioned on the table, made him feel as though he was 'looking up' at everybody else. He asked for the camera to be raised up to his perception of eye level by placing some books under the camera. Additionally, a problem occurred when one mobile user was attempting to decide on who was currently speaking. In later discussions, the mobile users commented that it was easier to know who was talking depending on their ability to recognise different voices. It was noted that the slow frame rate and poor resolution did not help pick out mouth movement, but it did help the mobile user pick out who was speaking by observing the direction in which the meeting participants were looking.

-535-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 1364

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.