Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview
depending on the instructor's plan and the student's mastery and different criteria for scoring and grading of the students.
2.2 Necessary Data
The necessary data for operation of the programme is organized in arrays. There are arrays containing:
1. text of changing situations and questions;
2. text of suggested decisions for each screen. The decisions may be either correct, or wrong, or useless. The correct decisions are useful and obligatory for proper solving of the case. The wrong decisions do not bring about solving of the case, they are harmful (sometimes dangerous) to the patient. The useless actions of the physician are not directly harmful, but they require expenses and slow down the solving of the case.
3. text of comments to each possible decision;
4. weights of suggested decisions. The weights of the correct decisions are positive numbers, corresponding to the degree of their necessity. The weights of the wrong decisions are negative numbers, corresponding to the degree of harm. The weights of the useless decisions are equal to zero.
5. data for the inner interrelations between the screens, determined by the logic of solving the case. This data gives the direction of transition from one screen to another (next or previous or current).

2.3 Methods

Object-oriented method in JavaScript programming was used to develop the clinical case simulation (Netscape Documentation 1996). The basic characteristics of this method are the objects and the ways for their manipulation.

The main object in this programme is the screen. For each step of the problem solving process there is a screen where the computer gives information about the current situation, asks a question and suggests decisions, scores the student's choice, makes comments and then passes to a new screen. Thus the questions, the decisions, the comments, the weights of the chosen decisions and the transitions to another screen are the elements of the screen. The JavaScript representation for definition of the object screen is given below:

-687-

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