Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Policy perspectives on "Design for All"
Constantine Stephanidis1, Gavriel Salvendy2, Pier Luigi Elimiliani3, Demosthenes Akoumianakis1 1 Institute of Computer Science, Foundation for Research and Technology- Hellas, Science and Technology Park of Crete, GR-71110, Heraklion, Crete, Greece email: cs@ics.forth.gr
2 School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, 1287 Grissom Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1287, USA, email: salvendy@ecn.purdue.edu
3 Institute of Research on Electromagnetic Waves "Nello Carrara", National Research Council, Via Panciatichi, 64, 50127 Firenze, Italy, email: ple@iroe.fi.cnr.it

1 Introduction

The vision of universal design has underpinned recent work by researchers in the fields of HCI and Assistive Technology. The main results today vary in context, scope and applicability across application domains. In particular, recent efforts towards universal design in HCI have provided a design wisdom in the form of universal design principles ( Story 1998), general guidelines (e.g., HFES/ANSI 200 1997), platform- or domain-specific guidelines (e.g., W3C-WAI1 Accessibility Guidelines).

In addition to guidelines, several technical research and development projects have provided insights towards new user interface development frameworks and architectures that account (explicitly or implicitly) for several issues related to accessibility and interaction quality. Representative examples include the European Commission funded projects TIDE-ACCESS TP1001 and ACTS- AVANTI AC042, as well as the Japanese FRIEND21 initiative ( Institute for Personalised Information Environment 1995). Although the architectural

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1
World Wide Web Consortium - Web Accessibility Initiative (http://w3c.org/WAI/).

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