Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Corpus-based User Interfaces

Mark T. Maybury, Sam Bayerand Frank Linton Information Technology Division, The MITRE Corporation
202 Burlington Road, Bedford, MA 01730, USA
{maybury, sam, linton}@mitre.org, http://www.mitre.org/resources/centers/it/


1 Introduction

Corpus-based methods are characterized by the collection of a large corpus of phenomena, its annotation with standard markup, the application of statistical techniques across annotated data to learn algorithms that perform key tasks, the establishment of community-wide benchmarks and methods for the evaluation of common tasks, and the use of the data and algorithms to evaluate performance on unseen data. A corpus-based approach uses large amounts of data to both train systems and evaluate their performance, thus being useful to several communities including system builders, evaluators, and research sponsors. Corpus-based methods have resulted in regular and predictable improvement in several application areas including information retrieval ( Harman 1998), information extraction ( Hirschman 1998), and topic tracking and detection ( Allan 1998).

This methodology can be applied with similar benefits to user interface design, which typically consists of interface observation, analysis, and application of prescriptive design guidelines by experts. Usability methods often rely upon inspection methods (e.g., cognitive walkthroughs) to observe how humans interact with current systems, often complemented by Wizard of Oz experiments that measure how humans interact with postulated systems. Human Factors experts recognize that verbal protocol techniques and user observation suffer from subjectivity in data analysis and interpretation. We believe that instrumentation of interfaces could provide data to be (semi) automatically used for corpus-based learning of a range of phenomena, from user preferences to optimal dialogue/interaction strategies. Cuomo ( 1994) points out that there is useful information to be discovered in interaction data logs using techniques

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