Environmental Policy under Reagan's Executive Order: The Role of Benefit-Cost Analysis

By V. Kerry Smith | Go to book overview

8 ROBERT W. CRANDALLp*
THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF CLEAN AIR: PRACTICAL CONSTRAINTS ON WHITE HOUSE REVIEW

THE Reagan regulatory relief program represents, in part, a continuation of the trend toward greater White House review of federal regulatory programs that began in the Nixon administration. The "Quality of Life" reviews in the Nixon administration were perhaps the first steps in this direction, but the first broad use of White House review began in 1974 with President Ford's executive order establishing the inflation impact statement for all major regulatory initiatives. This review process was extended by the Carter administration through its Regulatory Analysis and Review Group.

When President Reagan assumed office, he established a new Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs within the Office of Management and Budget. This office was given the responsibility for implementing a new regulatory relief program and more specifically Executive Order 12291, requiring a form of benefit-cost analysis for new major regulatory initiatives. The Reagan program represented a strengthening of the White House review processes initiated by the previous two administrations, for OMB could now reject a regulatory analysis and thus frustrate the attempt to propose new regulations. But the stress was upon regulatory "relief" rather than "reform"; therefore, success was to be measured by the reduction in the rate of flow of new regulations to burden industry.

White House review has grown and developed as a mechanism to assure that regulatory decisions reflect a balancing of costs and benefits rather than simply reflecting the parochial interests of constituent groups that cluster

____________________
p*
Senior Fellow, Economics Studies Program, Brookings Institution.

-205-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Environmental Policy under Reagan's Executive Order: The Role of Benefit-Cost Analysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 270

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.