THE MIRACLE OF LAS PALMAS

THIS is the story of a gallant officer who loved his profession, his regiment, his country, but above all, whiskey; of his miraculous conversion to total abstinence, and of the humble instrument that worked the miracle. At the time it was worked, a battalion of the Thirty-third Infantry had been left behind to guard the Zone, and was occupying impromptu barracks on the hill above Las Palmas. That was when Las Palmas was one of the four thousand stations along the forty miles of the Panama Railroad. When the railroad was "reconstructed" the name of Las Palmas did not appear on the new time-table, and when this story appears Las Palmas will be eighty feet under water. So if any one wishes to dispute the miracle he will have to conduct his investigation in a diving-bell.

On this particular evening young Major Aintree, in command of the battalion, had gone up the line to Panama to dine at the Hotel Tivoli, and had dined well. To prevent his doing this a paternal government had ordered that at the Tivoli no alcoholic liquors may be

-30-

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The Lost Road
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • The Lost Road 1
  • The Miracle of Las Palmas 30
  • Evil to Him Who Evil Thinks 61
  • The Men of Zanzibar 92
  • The Long Arm 137
  • The God of Coincidence 157
  • The Buried Treasure of Cobre 189
  • The Boy Scout 245
  • Somewhere in France 271
  • The Man Who Had Everything 308
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