"SOMEWHERE IN FRANCE"

MARIE GESSLER, known as Marie Chaumontel, Jeanne d'Avrechy, the Countess d'Aurillac, was German. Her father, who served through the Franco-Prussian War, was a German spy. It was from her mother she learned to speak French sufficiently well to satisfy even an Academician and, among Parisians, to pass as one. Both her parents were dead. Before they departed, knowing they could leave their daughter nothing save their debts, they had had her trained as a nurse. But when they were gone, Marie in the Berlin hospitals played politics, intrigued, indiscriminately misused the appealing, violet eyes. There was a scandal; several scandals. At the age of twenty-five she was dismissed from the Municipal Hospital, and as now -- save for the violet eyes -- she was without resources, as a compagnon de voyage with a German doctor she travelled to Monte Carlo. There she abandoned the doctor for Henri Ravignac, a captain in the French Aviation Corps, who, when his leave ended, escorted her to Paris.

The duties of Captain Ravignac kept him in barracks near the aviation field, but Marie he

-271-

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The Lost Road
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • The Lost Road 1
  • The Miracle of Las Palmas 30
  • Evil to Him Who Evil Thinks 61
  • The Men of Zanzibar 92
  • The Long Arm 137
  • The God of Coincidence 157
  • The Buried Treasure of Cobre 189
  • The Boy Scout 245
  • Somewhere in France 271
  • The Man Who Had Everything 308
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