Biological Effects of Radiation: Mechanism and Measurement of Radiation, Applications in Biology, Photochemical Reactions, Effects of Radiant Energy on Organisms and Organic Products - Vol. 2

By Benjamin M. Duggar | Go to book overview

carbon dioxide only in the light and Gaffron has shown that various fatty acids may apparently serve as hydrogen donors. Whether this is a true photosynthesis, that is, an accumulation of energy at the expense of the light absorbed, is in the present state of our knowledge difficult to say. To what extent reactions here play a part analogous to some known in organic chemistry in which carbon dioxide is taken up by organic molecules, which in themselves are probably exothermic reactions, is as yet uncertain and open to speculation. The observations on these organisms clearly demonstrate that they can absorb carbon dioxide in the presence of light with a simultaneous catabolism of organic compounds. It lends support to the supposition that in the photosynthetic process two mechanisms, carbon dioxide absorption and oxygen liberation, may not be involved in the same reaction but in integrated reactions, either or both of which may be photochemical, a concept which has engaged the attention of plant physiologists for many years.

In conclusion it may be said that from the observations thus far assembled, the photosynthetic process is known to be an endothermic, energy storing process, in which the energy accumulated is a result of a photochemical reaction. The mechanism of the conversion of the light into the chemical energy is, however, still a mystery, because we are in ignorance of the nature of those conditions and factors essential for the reaction which are intimately associated with the protoplasmic activity of the living cell.


REFERENCES

1. ARNOLD AUGUST. "Der Verlauf der Assimilation von Helodea canadensis unter konstanten Aussenbedingungen." Planta Arch. Wiss. Bot. 13: 529-573. 1931.

2. ARNOLD WILLIAM. "The effect of ultraviolet light on photosynthesis." Jour. Gen. Physiol. 17: 135-143. 1933.

3. ARTARI A. "Zur Ernährungsphysiologie der grünen Algen". Ber. Deut. Botan. Ges. 19: 7-9. 1901.

4. BAAS-BECKING L. G. M., and P. A. Ross. "Notes on micro-spectra. I." Jour. Gen. Physiol. 9: 111-114. 1925.

5. BLACKMAN F. F. "Optima and limiting factors". Ann. Bot. 19: 281-295. 1905.

6. BORESCH K. Algenfarbstoffe. Klein, G. Handbuch der Pflanzenanalyse. 3( 2): 1382-1410. Julius Springer; Wien, 1932.

7. BOYSEN-JENSEN P. "Über die Beatimmung der Assimilationsintensität". Planta Arch. Wiss. Bot. 21: 368-380. 1933.

8. BRIGGS G. E. "Experimental researches on vegetable assimilation and respiration. XX." Proc. Roy. Soc. London B 105: 1-35. 1929.

9. BROWN H. I., and F. ESCOMBE. "On the physiological processes of green leaves. III." Proc. Roy. Soc. London B 76: 69-111. 1905.

10. BUDER JOHANNES. "Zur Biologie des Bacteriopurpurins und der Purpurbakterien". Jahr. Wiss. Bot. 58: 525-628. 1919.

11. BURGERSTEIN A. "Über das Verhalten der Gymnospermenkeimlinge im Lichte und im Dunkeln". Ber. Deut. Botan. Ges. 18: 168-194. 1900.

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Biological Effects of Radiation: Mechanism and Measurement of Radiation, Applications in Biology, Photochemical Reactions, Effects of Radiant Energy on Organisms and Organic Products - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Xix Photoperiodism 677
  • Introduction 677
  • References 709
  • Xx Plant Growth in Continuous Illumination 715
  • References 725
  • Xxi the Effects of Light Intensity Upon Seed Plants 727
  • Introduction 727
  • References 757
  • Xxii Effects of Different Regions of the Visible Spectrum Upon Seed Plants 763
  • Introduction 763
  • Concluding Remarks 787
  • References 788
  • Xxiii Effect of the Visible Spectrum Upon the Germination of Seeds and Fruits 791
  • References 823
  • Xxiv the Effects of Visible and Ultra-Violet Radiation on the Histology of Plant Tissues 829
  • References 838
  • Xxv Some Infra-Red Effects on Green Plants 841
  • References 851
  • Xxvi the Effect of Ultra-Violet Radiation Upon Seed Plants 853
  • Introduction 853
  • Concluding Remarks 881
  • References 882
  • Xxvii the Effects of Radiation on Fungi 889
  • Introduction 889
  • References 910
  • Xxviii the Problem of Mitogenetic Rays 919
  • Introduction 919
  • Conclusions 944
  • References 946
  • Xxix Effects of X-Rays Upon Green Plants 961
  • Introduction 961
  • General Summary 980
  • References 983
  • Xxx the Effects of Radium Rays on Plants 987
  • References 1009
  • Xxxi the Light Factor in Photosynthesis 1015
  • References 1051
  • Xxxii the Influence of Radiation on Plant Respiration and Fermentation Charles J. Lyon 1059
  • Introduction 1059
  • Summary 1071
  • References 1072
  • Xxxiii Growth Movements in Relation to Radiation 1073
  • Xxxiv Chlorophyll and Chlorophyll Development in Relation to Radiation 1093
  • References 1104
  • Xxxv Radiation and Anthocyanin Pigments 1109
  • Introduction 1109
  • Conclusion 1116
  • References 1118
  • XXXVI - Effects of Radiation on Bacteria 1119
  • References 1141
  • Xxxvii the Effects of Radiation on Enzymes 1151
  • References 1160
  • Xxxviii Induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Animals 1167
  • Introduction 1167
  • References 1202
  • Xxxix Radiation and the Study of Mutation in Animals 1209
  • Introduction 1209
  • References 1252
  • Xl Induced Mutations in Plants 1263
  • Introduction 1263
  • References 1278
  • Xli Induced Chromosomal Alterations 1281
  • References 1293
  • Xlii Induced Chromosomal Alterations in Maize 1297
  • References 1308
  • Xliii Biological Aspects of the Quantum Theory of Radiation Absorptions in Tissues 1311
  • References 1326
  • Subject Index 1331
  • Alphabetical List of Contributors 1343
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