The Clinton Legacy

By Colin Campbell; Bert A. Rockman | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
The Clinton Presidency: First Appraisals, ed. Colin Campbell and Bert A. Rockman ( Chatham, N.J.: Chatham House, 1995), 13-14.
2.
Richard Rose notes that "presidential scholars do not divide politically like most Americans." They are more than twice as likely as ordinary voters to hold liberal opinions and much less likely to hold conservative views. In view of these facts, we note that it is generally the case that such scholars are keen to advise Republican presidents to accommodate to the Democrats' congressional majorities but are less keen on advising Democratic presidents to accommodate to the Republicans' congressional majorities (an admittedly more novel circumstance). Given the scholars' Democratic party preferences, compromise is good for Republicans but less so for Democrats. See Richard Rose, "Evaluating Presidents," in Researching The Presidency: Vital Questions, New Approaches, ed. George C. Edwards III, John H. Kessel, and Bert A. Rockman ( Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1993), 453-84.
3.
Samuel Kernell notes that "just maybe survey respondents discriminate between the president as a public and private person, and they always have." See his The Challenge Ahead for Explaining President Clinton's Public Support, PRG Report ( Newsletter of the Presidency Research Group of the American Political Science Association) 21 (Spring 1999): 1-3.

Chapter 1: The Partisan Legacy
Two events shaped this essay, out of all proportion to any others. The need to think systematically about the New Democrats sprang from my association with the Oxford D.Phil. thesis by Kenneth A. Baer, "Reinventing Democrats: The Democratic Leadership Council and the Attempt to Change the Public Philosophy of the Democratic Party, 1981-1996"-- soon to be a major book. And the opportunity to develop the entire argument came with a public lecture series at Oxford, entitled "The Two Majorities and the Puzzle of Modern American Politics," conducted with Edward G. Carmines and hugely facilitated by him.

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