Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview

XXII. REVIEW AND CONCLUSIONS
Reference:--( Moon, ch. xxiv).
A. GREAT IMPORTANCE OF IMPERIALISM FROM 1870 TO PRESENT.
1. Effects on natives (above, XVII).
2. Effects on expansion of industry and commerce (above, XVIII).
3. Effects on international relations, alliances, ententes, wars (above, XVI).
4. Effects on domestic politics (see below, Part 9).
5. Non-speculative nature of these effects--definiteness of importance of imperialism to "average man" in terms of prosperity, taxes, wars, burdens of armament, tropical commodities such as rubber.

B. MUCH GREATER POTENTIALITIES, FOR GOOD OR FOR EVIL, AS REGARDS FUTURE, IN VIEW OF INTENSIFICATION OF IMPERIALIST CONTROL AND RIVALRY, AND OF LABOR COMPETITION. IMPERIALISM PERHAPS THE GREATEST PROBLEM OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY.

C. DISCUSSION OF THE PROBLEM.
1. Proposed panaceas and their inexpediency.
2. Need of distinguishing between desirable and undesirable results, and adjusting policies to secure maximum of former and minimum of latter.
3. Fundamental importance of intelligent realism; of sane public opinion.
4. More or less practical proposed reforms for discussion (Note: These are representative proposals for discussion; they are not advanced as author's opinions).
a. Extension of Open Door principle by negotiation and international agreements.
b. Extension of publicity regarding colonial administration, through Mandate Commission of League, or some substitute international commission.
c. Extension of mandate system to all tropical colonies.
d. Increased reliance on international intervention (as in Boxer War) instead of national intervention (as in Mexico, or in Morocco) to suppress disorders and protect life and property in turbulent regions.
e. Complete substitution of international for national protection of life and property of Europeans and Americans in tropical and other backward regions; advantages; difficulty of persuading all nations to adopt such a principle.
f. Gradual transfer to League of Nations of all colonies not inhabited by whites; impossibility of persuading imperialist nations to relinquish colonies at present.
g. International rationing of colonial raw materials; theoretical advantages; practical obstacles.
h. Special training for prospective colonial administrators.

-73-

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