Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
e. Revival of Italian irredentist enmity to Austria, and rivalry with Austria in Albania.
3. The secret exchange of letters between Italy and France, 1900.
a. French repudiation of designs on Tripoli and Cyrenaica.
b. Italian consent to French policy in Morocco.
4. The secret neutrality agreement of 1902.
a. Italy to remain neutral in case of attack by another Power on France or in case of French declaration of war "as the result of direct provocation."
b. Reciprocal pledge by France.

C. ENGLISH APPROVAL OF ITALIAN AIMS; ENGLAND VIRTUALLY AN UNOFFICIAL PARTNER IN FRANCO-ITALIAN MEDITERRANEAN ENTENTE.

X. THE ENTENTE CORDIALE
References:-- Gooch, 337-47. * Marriott, 189-201. * Mowatt, ch. xxvii, 268-72. World Peace Foundation, Background of the War, 204-5, 226-34 (text). # Brandenburg, ch. viii. Anderson and Hershey, 282-8. * Ward and Gooch, III, 305-18. Bourgeois and Pagès, 290-6. E. D. Morel, Morocco in Diplomacy. Lémonon, chs. v-ix. Debidour, I, 187-96. Friedjung , I, 385-414. Tardieu, France and the Alliances. G. Stuart, French Foreign Policy. J. L. De Lanessan, Histoire de l'Entente Cordiale francoanglaise. Barclay, Anglo-French Reminiscences. Compare Part 3, VIII.
A. ANGLO-FRENCH ANTAGONISM BEFORE 1904.
1. Traditional enmity of France and England.
a. Hundred Years' War.
b. Colonial Wars, 1689-1763.
c. French aid of American revolution.
d. English hostility during Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars.
e. Lingering bitterness and distrust on both sides.
2. Modern imperialist rivalry.
a. French resentment of English occupation of Egypt.
b. French humiliation in Fashoda incident.
c. Competition for control of railways in Abyssinia.
d. Boundary disputes in western and central Africa.
e. Disputes regarding French fishing rights in Newfoundland.
f. Disputed claims on borders of Siam.
g. Rival claims in New Hebrides.
h. Rival interests in Morocco.
i. French alliance with Russia, rival of England in Asia and Near East.
3. Other causes of antagonism.
a. English dislike of Catholicism.
b. English belief that French were "fickle," "volatile," "unreliable," doctrinaire (largely because of frequency of revolutions and, since 1871, of cabinet changes).
c. English belief that French were immoral and "decadent."
d. Popularity of idea that "Teutonic" peoples were superior to "Celtic" and "Latin" races.

-96-

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