Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
b. German proposal for reciprocal pledge of neutrality in case other party became involved in war; English refusal.
c. Refusal of Germany to accept British Two-Power naval standard or to restrict navy without above-mentioned neutrality agreement.
5. Hope of Triple Alliance (as shown in additional protocol to Triple Alliance Treaty of 1912) to gain England's support of Triple Alliance policy regarding northern Africa.
6. Confidence of Triple Entente regarding Italy's unwillingness to fight against France, as shown in secret conversations between French president and Russian ambassador in Paris, 1912.
7. Generalizations.
a. Prevalence of secret diplomacy, not altogether harmonious with public diplomacy.
b. Apparently unreliable nature of the alliances and ententes, in view of constant danger of secret bargains between members of opposing coalition--examples:
i. Austrian suspicion of Italy's disloyalty ( Pribram).
ii. French fear of pro-German intrigues by Witte and reactionaries in Russia (Bourgeois and Pagès, p. 5).

E. ARMAMENT INCREASES (See Part 4, II-IV).

XX. THE SERAJEVO CRISIS AND OUTBREAK OF THE GREAT WAR

References:--Brief general accounts in English: * Gooch, ch. xvi (one of the best). * Hayes, II (rev. ed.), 711-8 (best short textbook account), and article in "These Eventful Years", I, ch. v (best summary in light of recent evidence). # G. P. Gooch, "Recent Revelations on European Diplomacy", in Journal of British Institute, Jan. 1923. # H. E. Barnes, "Assessing the Blame for the World War", in Current History, May 1924 able survey of new data), and discussion by various contributors in Current History, June 1924. # S. B. Fay, "New Light on the Origin of the War", Amer. Hist. Review, July and Oct. 1920, and Jan. 1921 (scholarly discussion chiefly of German and Austrian documents). B. Schmitt, "Triple Alliance and Triple Entente", in Amer. Hist. Review, Apr. 1924 (critical discussion of recent evidence). # C. A. Beard, Cross-Currents, chs. i-iii (able interpretation). F. Neilson, How Diplomats Make War and Duty to Civilization (brief assaults on wartime versions). Older versions, which may be significantly compared with present views: Seymour, chs. xi-xii. O. P. Chitwood, Immediate Causes of the Great War. It is impossible to list all important detailed discussions, but the following are among the most useful for students who desire more than the above summaries.

Diplomatic documents: official publications shortly after outbreak of war, conveniently collected in J. B. Scott (ed.), Diplomatic Documents, or in E. R. von Mach, Official Diplomatic Documents. German documents disclosed since war, in Deutschland Schuldig? Deutsches Weissbuch; M. Montgelas and W. Schücking (ed.), Die Deutschen Dokumente zum

____________________
*
English translation published by Carnegie Endowment, 1924, under title, Outbreak of the World War.

-105-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Syllabus on International Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.