Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
much valuable material, arranged by countries. Kennedy, Old Diplomacy and New, general but inadequate account. C. A. Beard, Cross-Currents in Europe To-Day, valuable chapters on economic conditions (iv), Russian relations (vi), America's position (ix). H. A. Gibbons, Europe Since 1918, comprehensive but more opinionative than factual. Temperley, Peace Conference, VI, on several topics. Teacher and student will need to rely on articles in These Eventful Years; in the supplement to The New International Encyclopedia; in annuals such as The Record of Political Events (cited as Record), The New International Year Book, The Annual Register, Levermore Handbooks of the League of Nations; in periodicals such as Foreign Affairs (quarterly), Current History (monthly), The Nation (weekly), and others; and newspapers. Foreign Affairs gives regularly a list of new books on international affairs and a very valuable guide to source material (official documents). Europäische Gespräche (monthly, Germany), gives a useful list of important books and magazine articles.There are of course innumerable controversial and journalistic books on postbellum affairs. Among the more interesting general surveys are: Nitti, Wreck of Europe and Decadence of Europe. Brailsford, After the Peace. Zimmern, Europe in Convalescence. Caillaux, Whither France? Whither Europe? Lloyd George, Is It Peace? Ashmead- Bartlett , Tragedy of Central Europe. J. Bardoux, Lloyd George et la France. L. Graux, Histoire des violations du traité de paix. R. Poincaré, Histoire politique (series). # F. Kellor, Security Against War.
A. ALLIED CONTINUATION CONFERENCES AND THE UNFINISHED PEACE SETTLEMENT.
1. Permature adjustment of Peace Conference, leaving following matters unsettled:
a. Hungarian treaty (above VI-D) and Turkish treaty (VI-F).
b. Numerous territorial problems--Memel, Eastern Galicia, Bessarabia, Albania, Montenegro, Thrace, Fiume and Dalmatia, eastern frontier of Poland, etc.
c. Status of Russia and Russian border states.
d. Terms and distribution of mandates.
e. Total amount, distribution, and payment of reparations.
2. Continuation of work of peace settlement by various organizations and conferences.
a. "Continuation conferences" of premiers, i.e. the Supreme Council.
i. Membership: premiers of principal Allies, sometimes with representatives of smaller Allies, or American "observer," or technical experts.
ii. Meetings: irregular but frequent from 1920 to 1923.
iii. Functions: settlement of important problems arising from peace treaties; preservation of Allied solidarity; tendency to usurp functions of League, Reparation Commission and other bodies.
b. Council of Ambassadors.
i. Composition: ambassadors of principal Allies, in Paris.
ii. Function: to relieve premiers of less important business arising out of execution and completion of peace settlement.
c. Reparation Commission.
i. Composition: delegates of Great Britain, France, Italy, and of either Belgium, or Japan, or Yugoslavia.

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