Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
C. Suspicious attitude toward French military and air armaments (above).
D. Increased danger of Continental militarism to England, because of longer range artillery and air forces, which lessen value of English Channel as a protecting barrier.

D. NAVAL SUPREMACY.
References:--See Part 4, especially Protheroe, The British Navy. H. Asquith , Genesis of the War. W. Churchill, World Crisis. Lord Fisher, Memories. Buell, Washington Conference, ch. v.
A. Importance for defense:
I. Of British isles, not protected by a large army, and dependent on overseas food.
II. Of overseas possessions.
B. Economic importance.
I. To safeguard British shipping and commerce.
II. To protect imperialist economic interests.
C. Importance in British diplomacy.
I. Historic struggles against Spanish, Dutch, and French naval rivalry.
II. The "two-power" standard.
III. German naval rivalry as one reason for British ententes with France ( 1904) and Russia ( 1907).
IV. Preservation of naval supremacy as an important issue of the Great War.
V. Refusal to accept Wilson's 2nd point, "absolute freedom of navigation upon the seas alike in peace and war . . ."
D. Acceptance of naval equality with the United States, at Washington Conference of 1921.
I. As a significant departure from historic policy of supremacy.
II. As a result of financial difficulties after the war.
III. As a mark of tendency toward solidarity with U. S.
E. New factors which may fundamentally affect British naval policy.
I. Growing importance of military and naval aviation.
II. The submarine.
III. The League of Nations.

E. BRITAIN AND ISLAM.
References:--♯ Bowman, "The Mohammedan World," Geogr. Review, Jan., 1924. Eversley and Chirol, Turkish Empire. L. Stoddard, New World of Islam.
1. Necessity of conciliating Mohammedan sentiment, in view of large Mohammedan population of British Empire.
2. Difficulty of reconciling this aim with:
A. Dismemberment of Ottoman Empire.
B. British rule over Mohammedan populations.
3. Attempts to conciliate Islam.
A. Grants of partial independence to Egypt and Mesopotamia.
B. Benevolent attitude toward Kingdom of Hejaz.
C. Abandonment of war-time aim of ousting Turks from Constantinople.

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