Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
B. Utility of such alliances.
I. To compensate for loss of Russia as an ally and for weakening of Entente Cordiale.
II. To prevent spread of Russian Bolshevism.
III. To prevent war of revenge by Germany.
IV. To support dominant position of France on Continent.

C. COLONIAL EMPIRE.
1. Economic and sentimental basis of French imperialism (Part 3).
2. Importance in French diplomacy.
3. Reliance on colonial troops to supplement man-power resources of small and stationary population of France.
4. Policy of commercial monopoly of colonial trade--protective tariffs against non-French imports into French colonies; export duties.
5. Conciliation of Moslems, especially in North Africa and Near East.

D. SEA POWER.
I. Importance of naval control of western Mediterranean, to assure safe communications with African colonies and, in war, transport of African troops to France.
II. Importance of naval or air power as a weapon in case of conflict with England.
III. Reluctance of France to accept naval ratio fixed by Washington Arms Conference, and to curb submarines in future wars.
IV. Rapid development of military aviation as a partial substitute for battleship power.

E. FINANCIAL INTERESTS.
1. Large French loans to, or investments in, foreign countries before war.
A. French loans to Russia, cementing Franco-Russian alliance.
B. French financial interests in Turkey.
2. Since the war.
A. Bolshevist repudiation of debt as an obstacle to French recognition of Russia.
B. Loans to Poland, Czechoslovakia, Rumania, Yugoslavia, as methods of promoting French political and military aims.
C. Insistence on German reparation payments, necessary to defray reconstruction costs and maintain French credit.

III. ITALY
References:-- ♯ C. Schanzer, article in "Foreign Affairs", March, 1924. ♯ Bowman, ch. v. T. Tittoni, Italy's Foreign and Colonial Policy. Memoirs of Crispi, Giolitti, etc. Other references in Parts 3-6.
A. IMPERIALISM.
1. Political, economic, strategic, historic bases.
2. Imperialist interests in northern Africa as a guiding principle in Italy's pre-war policy.
A. Entry into Triple Alliance, after French seizure of Tunis (above).

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