Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
B. Agreements with other Great Powers, permitting Italian seizure of Tripoli (above).
4. In the Great War.
A. Hope of enlarging African possessions, acquiring Albania and obtaining share in Asia Minor, as inducements offered by Allies to obtain Italy's aid in war (above).
5. After the war.
A. Disappointment of Italian aspirations in Asiatic Turkey and Albania.
B. Imperialist policies of Mussolini.
I. Maintenance of political prestige of Fascisti as motive for aggressive policy.
II. Desire to make Adriatic an "Italian lake."
III. Desire to make Italy dominant power in Mediterranean.
A. Hence antagonism toward Greece.
B. Italo-Spanish entente as rival of France.
C. Possible bearings of this policy on relations with England.
IV. Russo-Italian agreement of 1923.
V. Declared purpose of developing present colonies.

B. IRREDENTISM AS ONE REASON FOR ITALY'S BREAK WITH TRIPLE ALLIANCE, PARTICIPATION IN GREAT WAR, POLICY AT PEACE CONFERENCE, AND CONTROVERSY WITH YUGOSLAVIA OVER FIUME (above).

C. DEFENSE.
1. Demand for strategic frontiers on the north, as safeguard against any possible Austro-German war of revenge.
2. Naval defense.
A. Importance of naval security to Italy.
I. Long coast line.
II. Dependence on sea-borne imports (below).
B. Italian insistence on naval control of Adriatic Sea.
C. Limitation of Italian navy by Washington Arms Conference, 1921 (N.B. equality with France, and inferiority to Great Britain).
D. Importance of friendly relations with England or France.

D. INDUSTRIALISM AND DEPENDENCE ON IMPORTED RAW MATERIALS (N.B. coal, oil, iron, raw cotton, wool, raw silk, timber) AND FOOD (N.B. wheat).
1. Necessity of such imports to support industrial population.
2. Dependence of such imports on good-will of naval powers.
3. Importance of commercial agreements with countries producing such materials.
4. Importance of obtaining markets for manufactured goods. 5. Italian proposals, since war, for international control of raw materials.

IV. JAPAN

References:--* Bowman, The New World, ch. xxxi. ♯ Buell, The Washington Conference, especially chs. i-iv, x. Pooley, Japan's ForeignPolicies

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