Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
112-123. C. R. Fish, American Diplomacy, chs. 36-8. W. Hines, "Peace Agencies and Politics" and Wickersham, "The Senate and Our Foreign Relations" in Foreign Affairs, Dec. 1923. H. C. Lodge, "Foreign Relations of the United States" and E. M. House, "America in World Affairs," in Foreign Affairs, June, 1924. Also general references above and references for topic IV above.
A. REACTION OF FOREIGN RELATIONS ON DOMESTIC POLITICS.
1. In elections--candidates may be elected or defeated by margin of voters whose choice is determined by foreign policy, although domestic policies may be more important.
a. Republican victory of 1920, in which League issue helped to assure victory for high tariff, altered labor policy, and other domestic policies.
b. Lloyd George Coalition victory in British elections of 1918 due largely to question of reparations, yet decisive also for domestic policies for four years.
2. In European cabinet crises--cabinets often overturned on questions of foreign policy, although domestic policies are thereby disturbed.
a. Overthrow of Briand cabinet by Poincaré in 1922, solely on matter of foreign policy.
b. German cabinet crises since 1919 largely due to foreign policy.
3. In danger of war.
a. Great activity of advocates of larger armament.
b. Overshadowing of domestic by foreign policy.
4. In war.
a. Almost complete subordination of domestic to war policies.
b. Tendency toward party truce--in European countries.
i. "Union sacrée" of all parties in France during Great War.
ii. Party truce, and later Coalition, in England during Great War.
iii. Temporary reconciliation of hostile parties even in Germany and Russia at outbreak of war in 1914.
5. Reaction of foreign affairs on domestic problems, hence indirectly on politics.
a. Creation of heavy financial burdens by wars and armaments; hence, increased importance of finance and tax measures in domestic politics.
b. Creation of economic problems by wars or international crises which disturb foreign markets and exchanges; hence, effect on domestic politics.
i. Expansion of European demand for American agricultural products during Great War, and later contraction, resulting in hardship for farmers, and, indirectly, "Farmers' Bloc" in Congress.
ii. Unemployment's effects on post-war British politics.
c. In the United States, reaction of European crises and wars on immigrant population and problem of Americanization.
I. Example--German sympathies of German-Americans during Great War.
II. Nationalistic agitation of Italian, Polish, Czech, Greek,

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