Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview

B. THE TENDENCY TOWARD INTERNATIONALISM.
Special references:-- * Krehbiel, 141-5. # Hayes, Modern Europe, II, 679-87. Burns, International Intercourse. Woolf. Hobson. Other references given above.
1. Internationalism of commerce and finance and labor agitation (Part 8), reflected in international management of international means of communication, international labor legislation, agreements concerning copyrights, industrial property, etc. (below, IV, and VIII).
2. Cultural internationalism--science, education, literature, art, music, travel, religion.
3. Military and naval internationalism--substitution of military alliances for military self-sufficiency, by most Great Powers, before 1914, and close military cooperation during Great War.
4. Humanitarian internationalism--necessity of international cooperation to deal with disease, drugs, white slave traffic, etc. (below, IV).
5. Political internationalism--similarity of many political institutions, of many political issues, of some political parties (notably Socialism).
6. Legal internationalism--tendency toward development of international law and justice (below, IX, X).
7. Governmental internationalism--development of many forms of international cooperation by governments in recent times (below, IV).
8. Pacifist internationalism--tendency to seek in internationalism the remedy for war.

C. THE PROBLEM OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION AS THE RESULT OF
CONFliCT AND COMPROMISE BETWEEN A AND B.

II. THE CONCERT OF EUROPE AND POLITICAL
COOPERATION
Special references:-- * Hughan, 30-41, 107-110. * Hayes, Modern Europe, II, 679-82. # Hicks, 23-33. # Potter417-437. W. A. Phillips, The Confederation of Europe. Satow, International Congresses. R. Doré, Essai d'une bibliographie des congrès internationaux. A. P. Higgins, The Hague Peace Conferences and other International Conferences.
NATURE OF THE CONCERT OF EUROPE--COPERATION OF EUROPEAN
GREAT POWERS WITHOUT ANY FORMAL OBLIGATIONS OR COVENANT.

B. ORIGINS.
1. The Concert as a continuation, in an informal manner, of the Holy Alliance and Quadruple Alliance.
2. The traditional unity of Christendom as a basis of the Concert.
3. The homogeneity of European civilization as a basis of the Concert.
4. Desire to prevent general war by dealing unitedly with disturbances of status quo, especially in Near East.

C. METHODS.
1. Irregular international conferences, including Great Powers and sometimes smaller powers, to deal with crises or specific subjects, e.g.--

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