Media Madness: Public Images of Mental Illness

By Otto F. Wahl | Go to book overview

Appendix A
Films about Mental Illness
In order to provide a more complete idea of the variety of contemporary films with mental illness themes, this appendix provides descriptions of films shown on television with release dates of 1985 or later. The descriptions have been taken verbatim from the television guide section of the Washington Post. Some of the films are made-for-TV movies, but many are movies originally released for theatrical showing.In order for a film to be included in this listing, some character must have been described, in the television guide, by a term clearly connoting mental illness--that is, by a term such as mentally ill, insane, mentally unstable, schizophrenic, mental hospital patient, deranged, psychotic, psychopathic, and so forth--or have similar terms in the title. Films set in psychiatric hospitals or described as focusing on patients in treatment were also included. Films described as dealing with alcoholism, drug abuse, or mental retardation, however, were not included; nor were films focused on psychiatrists or other kinds of psychotherapists even though these probably involved some presentation of psychiatric patients. The list also does not include over three hundred additional films released before 1985 which have also been shown on television in recent years. Finally, there are probably many additional films which involve psychiatric portrayals but which were not described as such and which, therefore, could not be included in this list.
After Dark, My Sweet (1990): A mentally unstable former prizefighter becomes embroiled in a kidnap plot engineered by a seductive widow and her shady cohort.
American Gothic (1988): A camping vacation turns deadly after three couples take refuge on an island populated by two elderly eccentrics and their demented offspring.

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Media Madness: Public Images of Mental Illness
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter One - Madness, Madness Everywhere 1
  • Chapter Two - Words and Laughter 14
  • Chapter Three - A Breed Apart 36
  • Chapter Four - Murder and Mayhem 56
  • Chapter Five - So What? 87
  • Chapter Six - So, Why? 110
  • Chapter Seven - Future Images 132
  • Chapter Eight - Exit Lines 164
  • Appendix A - Films about Mental Illness 169
  • Appendix B - Television Shows about Mental Illness 180
  • Appendix C - Novels about Mentally Ill Killers 189
  • Notes 195
  • Index 209
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 224

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.