Sadism and Masochism: The Psychology of Hatred and Cruelty - Vol. 2

By Wilhelm Stekel; Louise Brink | Go to book overview

XVIII
THE EPILEPTIC SYMPTOM COMPLEX AND ITS ANALYTIC TREATMENT 1

Men who think themselves wise believe nothing till the proof. Men who are wise believe anything till the disproof.

JAMES ELROY FLECKER.

I published my work Die psychische Behandlung der Epilepsie [ The Psychic Treatment of Epilepsy ] in the year 19112 and came thereby to the following conclusions:
1. Epilepsy is more frequently a psychogenic disorder than we have hitherto believed.
2. In all cases it manifests a strong criminality, which is rejected by consciousness as unbearable.
3. The seizure is a substitute for the crime, therefore perhaps also a sexual act that is a crime (self-protection).
4. The seizure frequently arises through fear of God's punishment and symbolizes guilt, punishment, and death.
5. Pseudoepilepsy is curable by means of analytic psychotherapy. It necessitates long periods of treatment, inasmuch as the splitting of the personality has proceeded to a very great extent.

This work had not the good fortune to attract the attention of neurologists to it. It was not given a test, and it was left for a long time to me to carry out the tests alone with a small amount of material. The results were so remarkable that I decided to rouse my pupils and fellow workers to continue the investigation. The material also came to me in rich streams. We are now working concentrically upon the analytic exploration of the "epileptic symptom complex." In this work before us observations will be given from twelve cases out of my recent experience and from nine cases which my assistant, Dr. Graven, has been able to analyze under my direction and in part with my assistance.

-331-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sadism and Masochism: The Psychology of Hatred and Cruelty - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 476

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.