TWO GALLANTS

THE grey warm evening of August had descended upon the city and a mild warm air, a memory of summer, circulated in the streets. The streets, shuttered for the repose of Sunday, swarmed with a gaily coloured crowd. Like illumined pearls the lamps shone from the summits of their tall poles upon the living texture below which, changing shape and hue unceasingly, sent up into the warm grey evening air an unchanging, unceasing murmur.

Two young men came down the hill of Rutland Square. One of them was just bringing a long monologue to a close. The other, who walked on the verge of the path and was at times obliged to step on to the road, owing to his companion's rudeness, wore an amused listening face. He was squat and ruddy. A yachting cap was shoved far back from his forehead and the narrative to which he listened made constant waves of expression break forth over his face from the corners of his nose and eyes and mouth. Little jets of wheezing laughter followed one another out of his convulsed body. His eyes, twinkling with cunning enjoyment, glanced at every moment towards his companion's face. Once or

-58-

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Contents 5
  • The Sisters 7
  • An Encounter 20
  • Araby 33
  • Eveline 42
  • After the Race 49
  • Two Gallants 58
  • The Boarding House 74
  • A Little Cloud 85
  • Counterparts 106
  • Clay 123
  • A Painful Case 133
  • Ivy Day in the Committee Room 148
  • A Mother 171
  • Grace 190
  • The Dead 224
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