The Troubadours at Home: Their Lives and Personalities, Their Songs and Their World - Vol. 1

By Justin H. Smith | Go to book overview

V
COURTHÉZON

Raimbaut d'Aurenga

A VERY quaint little town is Courthézon, a grey cap on a low round hill. Its mediæval walls are still pretty solid, and the battlemented gates frown portentously. But they intend no harm. They frown only to keep in character; and in reality, knowing right well the fine appearance they make in their strong old age, they think only of enjoying their distinction and enhancing their pictorial effect with every accessory they can summon. Would you have the proof? Study a little spot by the eastern gate.

For the space of some ten rods between the tower of the gate and the corner turret of the wall, the rampart has been entirely removed. The ancient moat is there still, and the brown water slips drowsily along out of one low arch and beneath another. Just here its inner edge is lined with reeds, and beyond the quivering stalks and waving blades you find a little tree-garden. At either end are the two great towers with ivy mantled thickly upon them. Patches of fresh grass decorate the ground. A few cactuses are there, some fir trees, plane trees wreathed with vines, and towering above them some great pines, not in the prim and complacent mood that pines often affect, but leaning far out over the moat--quite beyond it, four of them--as if longing to get away to the forest. Benches

-77-

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The Troubadours at Home: Their Lives and Personalities, Their Songs and Their World - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Authorities xv
  • I - Aix 1
  • II - Carpentras, Vacqueiras, Orange, And Vaucluse 14
  • III- Les Baux and Tortona 33
  • IV - Monferrat 52
  • V - Courthézon 77
  • VI - Die and Valence 95
  • VII - Anduze 107
  • VIII - Montpellier 119
  • IX - Nontron and Mareuil 139
  • X - Béziers and Burlatz 155
  • XI - Béziers 172
  • XII - Ribérac, Agen, and Beauville 188
  • XIII - Narbonne 206
  • XIV - Perpignan, Castell-Rossello, And Cabestany 224
  • XV - Barcelona 240
  • XVI - Goito, Sambonifacio, and Rodez 254
  • XVII - Marseille, Saissac, and St. Gilles 273
  • XVIII - Carcassonne and Cabaret 290
  • XIX - Foix 311
  • XX - Toulouse and Pamiers 328
  • XXI - Miraval, Boissezon, Castres, and Muret 345
  • XXII - Albi and Gaillac 368
  • XXIII - Le Thoronet and Grandselve 386
  • Notes on Volume One 407
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