The Troubadours at Home: Their Lives and Personalities, Their Songs and Their World - Vol. 1

By Justin H. Smith | Go to book overview

XI
BÉZIERS

Arnaut de Maruelh (Concluded)

WOULD you like to read a love-letter of the time of Richard Cœur-de-Lion,--a love-letter written before there were looking-glasses,1--a troubadour's love- letter?

Béziers was Arnaut's home, but he could not remain there all the time. Every troubadour was a rover, and roving was a part of the profession as we have seen. Arnaut seems to have gone as far as Monferrat. Our Bonifaz was perhaps his friend, and in his castle he perhaps met Raimbaut de Vaqueiras, and bowed low before the Fair Knight; or possibly Guilhem III., whose portrait we had from the Lombard chronicle, was reigning still at the time of his visit. And he may have been at the Castle of the Vale when he sat down to write the Salutz d' Amor, the Greeting of Love, that has come down to us.2

The letter was of course in verse, and it was written on sheets of parchment in a single column that left wide margins on both sides. At the head of the first sheet there were two portraits, drawn so skilfully that, as people who saw them declared, they seemed actually to breathe, yet so very subtly that only those in the secret could tell whom they represented. The figure at the left was Arnaut kneeling and supplicating. From his lips issued

-172-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Troubadours at Home: Their Lives and Personalities, Their Songs and Their World - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Authorities xv
  • I - Aix 1
  • II - Carpentras, Vacqueiras, Orange, And Vaucluse 14
  • III- Les Baux and Tortona 33
  • IV - Monferrat 52
  • V - Courthézon 77
  • VI - Die and Valence 95
  • VII - Anduze 107
  • VIII - Montpellier 119
  • IX - Nontron and Mareuil 139
  • X - Béziers and Burlatz 155
  • XI - Béziers 172
  • XII - Ribérac, Agen, and Beauville 188
  • XIII - Narbonne 206
  • XIV - Perpignan, Castell-Rossello, And Cabestany 224
  • XV - Barcelona 240
  • XVI - Goito, Sambonifacio, and Rodez 254
  • XVII - Marseille, Saissac, and St. Gilles 273
  • XVIII - Carcassonne and Cabaret 290
  • XIX - Foix 311
  • XX - Toulouse and Pamiers 328
  • XXI - Miraval, Boissezon, Castres, and Muret 345
  • XXII - Albi and Gaillac 368
  • XXIII - Le Thoronet and Grandselve 386
  • Notes on Volume One 407
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 496

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.