The Troubadours at Home: Their Lives and Personalities, Their Songs and Their World - Vol. 1

By Justin H. Smith | Go to book overview

XVI
GOITO, SAMBONIFACIO, AND RODEZ

Sordel and the Other Italian Troubadours. Ugo Brunenc, Daude de Pradas, and Blacatz

NORTHERN Italy as well as northern Spain belonged in the troubadour world, and it is natural here to balance Catalonia and Amfos with Lombardy and the poet of Goito.

What an extraordinary destiny fell to his lot! He belied in advance every feature of the portrait known to posterity; won fortune in his own day by a character the exact opposite of that which gave him glory in after ages; and finally appeared to the world as an actual trinity, -- not three in one, to be sure, but one as three.1

Sordel, however--or, as Dante and Browning wrote it, Sordello--was by no means the only Italian troubadour, and in orderly processions the lesser dignities go first. There were nearly forty in all--Restori has counted up thirty-seven--and four things are to be said of them in general. First, they were Italians who composed in Provençal, for we are not concerned with the next stage of Italian poetry,--songs in the vernacular; secondly, as was natural, they were later than the troubadours of France who set them the fashion; thirdly, while the amorous and artistic nature of the Italians led them to admire the songs of Provence from an early period, their society was too full of turbulence for a similar free and luxuriant

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The Troubadours at Home: Their Lives and Personalities, Their Songs and Their World - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Authorities xv
  • I - Aix 1
  • II - Carpentras, Vacqueiras, Orange, And Vaucluse 14
  • III- Les Baux and Tortona 33
  • IV - Monferrat 52
  • V - Courthézon 77
  • VI - Die and Valence 95
  • VII - Anduze 107
  • VIII - Montpellier 119
  • IX - Nontron and Mareuil 139
  • X - Béziers and Burlatz 155
  • XI - Béziers 172
  • XII - Ribérac, Agen, and Beauville 188
  • XIII - Narbonne 206
  • XIV - Perpignan, Castell-Rossello, And Cabestany 224
  • XV - Barcelona 240
  • XVI - Goito, Sambonifacio, and Rodez 254
  • XVII - Marseille, Saissac, and St. Gilles 273
  • XVIII - Carcassonne and Cabaret 290
  • XIX - Foix 311
  • XX - Toulouse and Pamiers 328
  • XXI - Miraval, Boissezon, Castres, and Muret 345
  • XXII - Albi and Gaillac 368
  • XXIII - Le Thoronet and Grandselve 386
  • Notes on Volume One 407
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