The Troubadours at Home: Their Lives and Personalities, Their Songs and Their World - Vol. 1

By Justin H. Smith | Go to book overview

XXI
MIRAVAL, BOISSEZON, CASTRES, AND MURET

Raimon de Miraval

YOU have not forgotten Loba de Puegnautier, I trust, and the towers of Cabaret, where she lived. Pursue the gorge some three miles farther, and you will find it widening for a space. The road crosses a little stream and passes a ruinous church. Below the bridge-- a single arch of stone--there is a bit of New England meadow. The fresh, cool sward exhibits the same free mingling of native grasses that we find at home. The homely "butter-and-eggs" of our own brooksides welcomes us. Dandelions and buttercups are there, too, with clover in the sunny spots, and forget-me-nots in the dimples: while one of our own red squirrels, skirmishing behind a tree, challenges us to a game of hide-and-seek.

Above the bridge the clear and tuneful stream ripples against the foundations of the church.

What a touching picture are these broken walls in the midst of the vale! No English church at Yuletide begins to be so luxuriantly dressed. Sheets of ivy envelop the masonry; thick volumes of shrubbery fill the interior; evergreens throng the windows; light bushes crown the ledges and top the walls.

The ministration still goes on. Birds now sing the matins and the vespers. Young fir-trees, the comeliest of acolytes, now swing perfumed censers in the wind. The flower that fadeth preaches from chancel and from

-345-

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The Troubadours at Home: Their Lives and Personalities, Their Songs and Their World - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Authorities xv
  • I - Aix 1
  • II - Carpentras, Vacqueiras, Orange, And Vaucluse 14
  • III- Les Baux and Tortona 33
  • IV - Monferrat 52
  • V - Courthézon 77
  • VI - Die and Valence 95
  • VII - Anduze 107
  • VIII - Montpellier 119
  • IX - Nontron and Mareuil 139
  • X - Béziers and Burlatz 155
  • XI - Béziers 172
  • XII - Ribérac, Agen, and Beauville 188
  • XIII - Narbonne 206
  • XIV - Perpignan, Castell-Rossello, And Cabestany 224
  • XV - Barcelona 240
  • XVI - Goito, Sambonifacio, and Rodez 254
  • XVII - Marseille, Saissac, and St. Gilles 273
  • XVIII - Carcassonne and Cabaret 290
  • XIX - Foix 311
  • XX - Toulouse and Pamiers 328
  • XXI - Miraval, Boissezon, Castres, and Muret 345
  • XXII - Albi and Gaillac 368
  • XXIII - Le Thoronet and Grandselve 386
  • Notes on Volume One 407
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