Route from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake Valley

By Fawn M. Brodie; Frederick Hawkins Piercy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIX
Departure from Wide Creek∼Cooking with Buffalo
Chips∼Death of Elder Cooley's Child∼A Delicate
Morsel for a Cow∼The "Lone Tree"∼Ancient Bluff
Ruins∼Chimney Rock∼Meeting of Missionaries from
G. S. L. Valley∼Scott's Bluff∼Laramie's Peak∼
Separation of the Company

FRIDAY, the 8th.--Having completed our repairs, we left Wide Creek and crossed Black Mud Creek, Grass Creek, two other creeks or sloughs not mentioned in guides, and North Bluff Creek, and camped near good grass and water. Distance from Wide Creek, about 13 miles. There were plenty of buffalo chips there. They are composed of grass, masticated and digested, and dried in the sun. It is a common joke on the Plains that a steak cooked on these chips requires no pepper. It is marvellous the wonders time and circumstances work. Young ladies who in the commencement of the journey would hardly look at a chip, were now seen coming into the camp with as many as they could carry. They burn fiercely and cook quite as well as wood.

Saturday, the 9th.--Our road lay through the heaviest sand-hills we had then passed over, and we found that it was preferable to make the cattle pass over rough places covered with grass than to keep them in the sandy road. We caught 2 or 3 lizards to-day, which were beautiful little creatures and appeared to be quite harmless. Crossed Buffalo Creek and camped at Shepherd's Creek, distance 11 miles. During the night Elder Cooley's child died. The poor mother's grief was very affecting. What can be more distressing than to see a poor infant struggling with death and to be utterly unable to render assistance.

Sunday, the 10th.--We buried the child and recommenced our journey at 12 o'clock. Travelled, according to Horn's Guide, 9 miles to Petite Creek, having crossed 3 creeks running between bluffs rather difficult of ascent and descent. We saw a great variety of brilliantly coloured grasshoppers, some being very large. They were

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