Scenery: A Manual of Scene Design

By Harold Helvenston | Go to book overview

THE SCENE WEBSTER
Abstract setting. Any setting in which decorative motifs in their natural form are greatly modified, exaggerated, or obscured.
Act curtain. The curtain or drop lowered or drawn between acts.
Acting area. A space designed, constructed, or left practical for acting; any area of the stage floor, within the vision of the audience.
Apron. That part of the stage which extends in front of the curtain line; the forestage.
Architectural stage. Any stage with permanent basic features inspired by or derived from architecture.
Artist of the theatre. Anyone who contributes to the theatre through the medium of his own particular art; an author, an actor, a designer.
Asbestos (asbestos curtain). The foremost downstage curtain set between the act curtain and the auditorium. This is made of asbestos or metal and is lowered in case of fire.
Atmosphere. In scenery, the emotional or mental suggestion offered by a setting.
Back drop. Any cloth curtain used across the back stage either as a masking device or a decorative unit or both.
Back flap. A hinge, the pin of which can readily be removed in order that two pieces of scenery formerly joined by it may be separated.
Backing. Any flat or unit used behind an opening in the set to mask the backstage and add to the aesthetic effect of the basic setting.
Balcony. The area just above the orchestra equipped with seats for spectators.
Batten. An iron pipe suspended from the gridiron, to which scenery is attached. Battens are also made of wood.
Batten clamp. A special stage hardware device to fasten curtain or drops to a batten.
Blend. To effect a closer chromatic relation between adjacent colors, color and light, or any two or more elements of stage design.
Book-ceiling. A ceiling which collapses in the middle and is elevated in a V-shape to the ceiling by a single batten.
Border. Any cloth suspended above the stage to mask the "top works," act as a decorative unit, finish off a set at the top, or perform all of these functions in a stage setting.
Box-setting. A setting whose main characteristics are two side walls, a back wall, and a ceiling, all perfectly joined together.
Bring up. To raise the intensity of stage lights.
Building carpenter. The foreman of a stage building crew.
Ceiling cloth. The cloth covering the wooden ceiling frame.
Chalk snap line. A cord covered with chalk used to snap a straight line between two points. These lines are employed in the painting of architectural cornices, borders, and details.
Clout nail. Iron, flat-head nails, sectionally square--used in fastening corner blocks and keystones to units of flat construction.
Cold color. Color which reveals a predominantly negative emotional effect. Any chromatic variation ranging from green-yellow at one extreme through the greens and blues to blue-violet at the other extreme.
Color sketch. A scenic sketch showing actual colors to be used in the painting of a setting.
Constructivism. A naïve form of modern stagecraft based on substantial, acting structures, designed to intensify dramatic action instead of furnishing decorative scenic background for the actors.

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Scenery: A Manual of Scene Design
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Illustrations xv
  • Scenery and the Designer 3
  • A Process for Scene Design 11
  • A Process for Scene Design Working Drawings 17
  • A Process for Scene Design - The Scene Model 32
  • Light in the Scene 38
  • Scene Painting 51
  • The Exterior Scene - The Natural Exterior 61
  • The Exterior Scene the Architectural Exterior 68
  • Economy in Cost of Construction and Materials 72
  • The Strange Case of Scenery 79
  • The Scene Webster 83
  • Index 91
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