The Foes of Our Own Household

By Theodore Roosevelt | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A
WHY WE ARE AT WAR; THE GERMAN HORROR

Chapters II, VII, X, and XI are based on articles that have appeared in THE METROPOLITAN; chapter VIII on an article that has appeared in THE OUTLOOK; chapter III on a speech delivered on the Fourth of July last.

Let those who wish to understand the hideous evil wrought by the foes who at the moment are the most dangerous of those outside our own household, and the even greater menace to our future well-being presented by those who at the moment are the most dangerous of the foes within our own household, read such books as Owen Wister's "Pentecost of Calamity," Gustavus Ohlinger "Their True Faith and Allegiance," James Beck "Evidence in the Case," and "The War and Humanity," Arthur Gleason "Golden Lads," and "Our Part in the Great War," Frederick Palmer "With Our Faces Towards the Light," Vernon Kellogg "Headquarters' Nights," and the various documents, including poems, sketches, brief essays issued by that capital organization the Vigilantes--among the writers being Hermann Hagedorn, Porter Emerson Browne, Julian Street, Edwin Carty Ranck, and Wm. H. Fischer. If any man still honestly wishes to know "why we are at war," these writings will enlighten him. He can well ask why we did not go to war immediately after the Lusitania horror --and to this there never can be any satisfactory answer; but no brave and patriotic man or woman has the right to ask why we are at war now.

Germany and her subject-allies are now our foes from

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