Football; the Greatest Moments in the Southwest Conference

By Will Grimsley | Go to book overview

8
The Aggies Scored While the Bear Prayed

NOVEMBER 13, 1955 TEXAS A&M 20 RICE 12

The sixty-eight thousand spectators in the Rice Stadium at Houston were bored and restless. Scores of them moved toward the exits and into the parking lots. Only a little more than three minutes were left in the game and the die obviously had been cast. Rice led 12-0. Coach Paul (Bear) Bryant's so-called "Junction Boys" and the great John David Crow had been thoroughly throttled by the tough Rice defense. They were going nowhere in a tremendous hurry.

The boredom had wended its way to the spacious press box, overlooking the chalk-lined field. Some of the writers, the morning newspapermen, already were banging out their stories. Others leaned on their typewriters, sipped coffee from paper cups and indulged in small talk foreign to the game at hand. The game had offered little in the way of dramatics.

"Well, Mickey, you better be getting down to the dressing rooms," Clark Nealon, sports editor of the Houston Post said to the small, dark- haired man at his elbow.

"I know, and I'd rather take a beating than face Bryant," replied Mickey Herskowitz, the reporter assigned to the Aggies for post- game coverage.

"Why?" asked Nealon curiously.

"You know the Bear," said Mickey. "He's very superstitious and he'll blame that big story I did on him this morning for getting beat. He'll chew me out for jinxing him."

Rice had just scored its second touchdown and stretched its lead to 12-0. The clock showed 3:40 left. Herskowitz assembled his papers,

-81-

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