Legality and Locality: The Role of Law in Central-Local Government Relations

By Martin I. Loughlin | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This book has had such a long gestation period that I find it almost impossible properly to acknowledge the help that I have received. My filing cabinets, which are stuffed full of unpublished papers, reports, notes and opinions, attest to the generosity of so many people not only in local and central government but also from other public agencies, the world of finance and the legal and accounting professions. Since a number of these people prefer to remain anonymous, I feel that the best course would simply be to express in rather general terms my profound thanks to them all. So far as my academic colleagues are concerned, I trust that my debts to them are properly acknowledged in the notes to the text. There is, however, a small group for whom that recognition would be altogether inadequate. Malcolm Grant, Jeffrey Jowell and Patrick McAuslan have provided a constant source of encouragement, especially in those early years when the fog seemed thickest. They have read and commented on many of the papers in which the views I express in this book have been shaped. More recently, I am specifically indebted to Colin Crawford, Neil Duxbury, John Evans and Anthony Ogus for the care, precision and skill with which they have commented on particular chapters in draft form. If the reader thinks that the thesis of the book remains obscure or lies too deeply buried under detailed exposition, it will not be for the want of this group trying to get me to express my argument more clearly or concisely.

Most of my writing on this subject over the last decade or so has, in one form or another, been commissioned. Given the pace of change in the field this is not altogether surprising; otherwise, much academic commentary without a previously identified outlet would have been overtaken by events by the time it was published. I should therefore like to thank those who, during this period, have invited me to write or present papers on particular topics within this field. Not only did they provide me with the opportunity to have a first stab at the issue, but they also helped me to stick with the subject when other avenues were beginning to look more enticing (and certainly more straightforward). I am particularly obliged to the Commission for Local Democracy and to the editor of Public Law for permission to draw directly on material which was first published by them and which forms the basis for chapters 2 and 6 respectively. Finally, I should like to thank Richard Hart at OUP for his patience and encouragement throughout.

Martin Loughlin

-xii-

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