Gender Play: Girls and Boys in School

By Barrie Thorne | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Creative work and friendship are closely intertwined, and I want to thank the many people who helped nurture this book. The late Everett C. Hughes, one of a number of remarkable teachers in the Brandeis University Sociology Department in the late 1960s, helped me discover and trust my imagination as a sociologist and an ethnographer. A group of us who were graduate students at Brandeis also became part of the early women's liberation movement. Some of these friendships have endured across many years and long distances, and I want to acknowledge the continuing support of Judith Adler, Nancy Chodorow, Donna Huse, Rachel Kahn-Hut, Marcia Millman, Margaret Rhodes, Judith Stacey, Nancy Stoller, Gaye Tuchman, and Jasminka Gojkovic Udovicki. Nancy Stoller encouraged my first steps back into elementary schools. Countless conversations with Judith Adler, Nancy Chodorow, Marcia Millman, and Judith Stacey nourished the ideas in this book; each of them read drafts of chapters and in many other ways made it all possible.

During my years of teaching sociology and women's studies at Michigan State University, I was blessed with lively companions for feminist thinking and action, including Marilyn Aronoff, Teresa Bernardez, Marilyn Frye, Ruth Hamilton, Rick Hill, Joyce Ladenson, Merry Morash, Margaret Nielsen, Lynn Paine, Kate See, Ruth Useem, and

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