A Study in Boss Politics: William Lorimer of Chicago

By Joel Arthur Tarr | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
William Lorimer: U. S. Senator from Illinois

THROUGHOUT THE NATION during the winter and spring of 1908-09, struggles between opposing political factions upset the normal patterns of two-party politics.1 Historians have generally interpreted these conflicts in ideological terms as pitting progressives against conservatives, but this narrow framework overlooks important cultural and sectional divisions. While issues such as the direct primary, civil service, women's rights, and business regulation split political groups, questions such as local option and prohibition, rural-urban tension, and the cultural overtones of many progressive reforms intensified the competition. Bitter personal rivalries, devoid of ideological or cultural content, also played an important role.

Both political parties in the Forty-sixth Illinois General Assembly split over regional and cultural as well as political questions. The divisions were most marked in the Assembly or lower house. The Republican delegation divided into three factions which, for the sake of convenience, will be called the Deneen, the Lorimer, and the Hopkins factions. There were about fifty Deneenites, about thirty Lorimerites, and approximately twenty-five men tied to Hopkins, although lines were not always rigid between the three groups. For, as Democratic boss Roger C. Sullivan commented, "Well, sometimes they are enemies and sometimes they are friends . . . the checkerboard is moving all the time . . . and the men who are strong enemies to-day may be friendly six months from now."2

____________________
1
Mowry, The Era of Theodore Roosevelt, 72-82; Russel B. Nye, Midwestern Progressive Politics: A Historical Study of its Origins and Development 1870-1958 ( Harper Torchbook ed., New York, 1965), 212-214.
2
Dillingham Committee Hearings, V, 4403; Tribune, Nov. 6, 13, 1908; Hutchinson , Lowden, I, 179.

-199-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Study in Boss Politics: William Lorimer of Chicago
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 378

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.