Teaching Secondary School Social Studies

By James F. High | Go to book overview

7
Techniques of presentation

Not a mother, not a father, will do so much, nor any other relative; a well-directed mind will do us greater service. . . .

BUDDHA, 544 B.C.


1. Diversity and Unity of Methodology Aimed Toward Learning

The teacher teaches and the student learns--a mutual enterprise, and there is no one correct way to do it. Every teacher learns about educational philosophy, the psychology of learning, generalized and specific techniques of teaching. It is, therefore, not the purpose here to enter into a discussion of the best philosophical systems of pedagogical procedure. No teacher can learn one foolproof set of methods before he enters the profession--nor afterward. Naturally, it is necessary to have a basic philosophy and as much information as possible concerning specific ways of doing things. From these the individual teacher will find out in time how to adapt his knowledge to the end of furthering the knowledge of his students.

Among modern books on the subject, Gilbert Highet, in the Art of Teaching, has managed to generalize an attitude out of a long teaching career. His book illustrates what each individual teacher must do in the course of his time at teaching. Always holding the goal of increasing his students' understanding, he will take advantage of every idea or method that seems applicable. What works for one teacher, for one class, in one situation, will not necessarily be universally successful. The result is what counts.

Any list of specific methods attempting to be exhaustive would be a veritable catalogue, and it would overlap every other such list but not be in complete accord with any of them. In general, however, there are three fairly distinct large categories of teaching technique, with infinite variations,-and each associated with a philosophy, (1). The most traditional organization of material and method assumes essen-

-140-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teaching Secondary School Social Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 486

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.