History of North Carolina - Vol. 1

By Francis L. Hawks | Go to book overview

year, showed themselves too fierce in slaying some of the people in some towns, upon causes that on our part might easily enough have been borne withal, yet notwithstanding, because it was on their part justly deserved, the alteration of their opinions generally and for the most part concerning us is the less to be doubted. And whatsoever else they may be, by carefulness of ourselves, need nothing at all to be feared.

The best nevertheless in this, as in all actions besides, is to be endeavored and hoped, and of the worst that may happen notice to be taken with consideration, and as much as may be eschewed.


THE CONCLUSION.

Now I have (as I hope) made relation not of so few and small things, but that the country (of men that are indifferent and well disposed) may be sufficiently liked if there were no more known than I have mentioned; which doubtless and in great reason is nothing to that which remains to be discovered, neither as to the soil, nor commodities. As we have reason to gather by the difference we found in our travels, for although all which I have before spoken of, have been discovered and experimented not far from the sea-coast, where was our abode and most of our traveling, yet sometimes as we made our journeys further into the main and country, we found the soil to be fatter, the trees greater and to grow thinner, the ground more firm and deeper mould, more and larger champains, finer grass, and as good as ever we saw any in England; in some places rocky and far more high and hilly ground, more plenty of their fruits, more abundance of beasts, the more inhabited with people, and of greater policy and larger dominions with greater towns and houses.

Why may we not then look for in good hope, from the inner parts, of more and greater plenty, as well of other things, as of those which we have already discovered. Unto the Spaniards happened the like in discovering the main of the West Indies. The main also of this country of Virginia, extending some ways so many hundreds of leagues, as otherwise than by the relation of the inhabitants we have most certain knowledge of, where yet no Christian prince has any possession or dealing, cannot but yield

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