History of North Carolina - Vol. 1

By Francis L. Hawks | Go to book overview

NARRATIVE. 1584-1591.

CHAPTER I.

First English Colony in America planted in North Carolina.--Sir Walter Raleigh.-- Expedition of Amadas and Barlowe in 1584.--Inlet at which they probably entered not Ocracoke.--Interview and friendly intercourse with the natives.--River "Occam."--Roanoak Island.--Return of the expedition to England with two of the natives.--Name of Virginia applied by Queen Elizabeth to the lands discovered.-- Second expedition, under Sir Richard Greenville, sent by Raleigh in 1585.--Its arrival at Roanoak Island.--Sir Richard's return to England.--The command devolves on Ralph Lane.--Discoveries of the colonists.--Plot of the savages to massacre the English.--Defeated by Lane.--Return of the expedition with Sir Francis Drake, after one year's residence in Carolina.

THAT portion of the United States included within the limits of North Carolina, may justly claim the honor of having received the first English colony that was planted in the western hemisphere. The story of its trials, its disasters, and final failure, carries us back to a memorable period in England's history; and derives additional interest from its association with the life of one of the most remarkable men in an age when remarkable men were by no means uncommon. The reign of Elizabeth and the career of Sir Walter Raleigh, present to the historian of North Carolina the first actors in the early scenes of which that State has been the theatre.

It was the lot of Sir Walter Raleigh (as it commonly is that of public men possessing great energy of character) to occupy no middle position in the eyes either of friend or foe. The exaggerations of friendship raised him perhaps as much above the dead level of humanity as the revilings of hatred placed him below it. The devoted affection of his adherents was equaled only by the intense enmity of his foes. And yet, after all due allowance is

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