A Study of Error: A Summary and Evaluation of Methods Used in Six Years of Study of the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board

By Carl C. Brigham | Go to book overview

Second Annual Report of the Commission on Scholastic Aptitude Tests 1927

Number of Candidates Examined

The scholastic aptitude test was taken on June 25, 1927 by 7,350 candidates. The examination records of four candidates were invalidated because they were admitted to the test without a practice booklet. Two other candidates were forced to withdraw from the examination on account of illness. Through a clerical oversight, the records of three candidates who took the test and whose results were reported to the college were not classified. Of the remaining 7,341 candidates whose records were scored and reported to the colleges 4,311 were boys and 3,030 were girls. The centers at which the tests were given and the number of candidates examined at each center are listed in Table III. The tests were given in 365 centers and sub-centers in 285 examination centers.

The records of the 7,341 candidates were classified by colleges,* duplicates caused by the designation of more than one college being avoided by taking the college named first. The colleges for which the 4,311 boys were examined, arranged in the order of the number of candidates taking the test, are shown in Table I.


TABLE I
Yale University 1074
University of Pennsylvania 913
Princeton University 860
Harvard University 650
Columbia University 132
Williams College 112
Brown University 106
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 90
Swarthmore College 75
Amherst College 35
Dartmouth College 26
Tufts College 22
Cornell University 16
Lafayette College 16
Stanford University 13
Trinity College 13

Eight candidates were examined for Haverford College and eight candidates for Wesleyan University; seven each for Boston University and New York University; six for Union College; five each for Bowdoin College, Colgate University, Middlebury College and Springfield Junior College; four candidates each for Lehigh University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the University of Rochester and the University of Virginia; three candidates for the University of Miami; two candidates each for the College of the City of New York, Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, Deep Springs College, Hamilton College, Holy Cross College, United States Military Academy, University of California, University of Maine, University of Michigan, University of Vermont and West Virginia University; one candidate each for Albright College, California Institute of Technology, Fordham University, Georgetown University, American International College, Johns Hopkins University, Northwestern University, Purdue University, Rutgers University, St. Francis College, St. Stephen's College, Stevens Institute of Technology, University of Alabama, University of Buffalo, University of Chicago, University of New Mexico, University of the South, University of Southern California, University of Wisconsin, Virginia Military Institute and Washington University. Three candidates named preparatory schools as the institution they were planning to enter, the schools being Lawrenceville School, Mercersburg Academy and Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Thirty-seven boys were undecided as to their choice of a college at the time of taking the test.

The colleges for which the 3,030 girls were examined, arranged in the order of the number of candidates taking the test, are shown in Table II.


TABLE II
Smith College 692
Wellesley College 616
Vassar College 562
Mount Holyoke College 394
Radcliffe College 149
University of Pennsylvania 122
Bryn Mawr College 100
Swarthmore College 77
Wells College 65
Barnard College 64
Connecticut College for Women 37
Brown University 26
Albertus Magnus College 21
Goucher College 20

Seven candidates were examined for Wheaton College; five each for Boston University, Emmanuel College, Wilson College; four each for Stanford University and New Jersey College for Women; three each for Springfield Junior College, Simmons College, Sweet Briar College; two each for Cornell University, Georgetown Visitation Convent, Middlebury College, College of St. Elizabeth, Trinity College ( Washington, D. C.), University of California, and University of Wisconsin; one each for Arcadia College, Carnegie Institute of Technology, Cherry Lawn Graduate School, Elmira College, Hunter College, Jackson College for Women, Lake Erie College, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, College of New Rochelle, New York University, Oxford University ( England), Skidmore College, Syracuse University. Temple University, University of Buffalo. Sixteen candidates were undecided as to their choice of a college at the time of taking the examination.


General Arrangements for Scoring the Tests

The test was given on Saturday, June 25, and approximately 750 booklets were delivered on that day. The scoring of the test papers was begun on Monday, June 27.

The clerks who scored the tests were college undergraduates or graduate students selected on the basis of academic records and a high test record on another series of tests.

The total number of clerks employed during each day of scoring and the total number of hours spent each day are shown in Table IV.

The total scoring time this year was 4086.4 hours as against 5119.9 hours last year, a proportional reduction in time greater than the reduction in the number of candidates taking the test (690 less). The average scoring time per candidate was reduced from 38-⅕ minutes last year to 33-⅓ minutes this year--an improvement due to better organization of the work, improved scoring stencils, and various labor-saving devices which were introduced.

____________________
*
Due to the fact that candidates sometimes name college on their application blanks and another on their scholastic aptitude test booklets, the lists of colleges given here do not agree, either in colleges included or number of candidates, with the table of colleges chosen by candidates given in Appendix C.

-340-

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