The Second Tory Party, 1714-1832

By Keith Grahame Feiling | Go to book overview

I
FUSION AND CONFUSION
1742-1754

So came on the ugly angry winter of 1741-2. Sir Robert was falling. Patriot ladies brought to London gowns and headdresses unheard of since the death of Queen Anne. The good people of Exeter mobbed their member for not being in London to help 'pull Robin down'. In the Park a demented clergyman startled a sentry with--'Did you ever see the Leviathan? He is as like Sir Robert Walpole as ever two devils were like one another'. While Sir Robert sat in Downing Street without speaking, his eyes fixed for an hour together.

Three months of the new Parliament were enough to overthrow him, and in February he resigned, with the earldom of Orford, £15,000 a year for his family, and manifold tokens of the King's sorrow. This year and the next showed that political England was shivered into groups, and that among them the Tories were the weakest; years, in fact, opening a quarter of a century during which one Tory party died and another was very slowly being born. But life is more important than death; we must therefore follow the history of the Whig groups out of whom a second Tory party was to spring.

That two of these groups would take command had long been certain. 'The old corps' of official Whigs told Walpole that his retirement was 'absolutely necessary' to save the party, and perhaps the throne. Their leaders, Pelhams and Hardwicke and Devonshire, were ready for a transaction with Pulteney and Carteret, provided they would prevent any extreme prosecution of Walpole; nor would they accept the admission of Tories to the Cabinet. A degree of patriotism and deference for the Crown, some Whig feeling and some pride, determined Pulteney's course. To some he declared that Jacobitism was the danger, or that total change would mean chaos; to others he insinuated that the Cobham 'patriots' were caballing with

-39-

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The Second Tory Party, 1714-1832
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I- The Problem and Its Conditions 1
  • II- In the Wilderness 1714-1727 13
  • III- Sir Robert 24
  • I- Fusion and Confusion 1742-1754 39
  • V- The Watershed- I 1754-1760 58
  • VI- The Watershed- II 1760-1765 68
  • VII- The Watershed- III 1765-1768 87
  • VIII- The New Parties 1768-1774 99
  • IX 122
  • X- The Divide 1782-1784 143
  • XI- The Party of Mr. Pitt 1784-1792 164
  • XIII- The Breaking of the Pitt Party 1800-1806 213
  • XIV- The Age of Faction 1806-1812 247
  • XV- Aftermath of War 1813-1820 276
  • XVI- Breaking-Point (1820-1826) 304
  • XVII- The Break 1826-1830 345
  • XVIII- Finale 384
  • Authorities 405
  • Notes 409
  • Index 425
  • By the Same Author British Foreign Policy 1660-1672 *
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