The Other Victoria: The Princess Royal and the Great Game of Europe

By Andrew Sinclair | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
Adieu to England

Deal kindly by her, noble man,
She's but a child in years;
Cherish each hope, each new-found plan,
And banish all her fears.

Deal kindly with her when afar
From her sweet Island home;
Be thou to her a guiding star
Through all her days to come. . . .

Deal kindly for her Mother's sake,
So womanly and true.
Let not a fear her heart awake
When she bids her child adieu.

Deal kindly. She's her Country's Pride
Who gives her for thine own.
And to thy keeping does confide
A Jewel from her Crown.1

ON NEW YEAR'S EVE, 1857, the Princess Royal sent this poem from the magazine John Bull to her brother, the Prince of Wales. She was frightened at the prospect of leaving her home with a stranger, to live in a foreign country she had never seen. She loved her noble prince, or thought she did, but she knew little of what awaited her in Prussia. Her mother and father had arranged for the members of her household to come to Buckingham Palace during the weeks before the wedding so

-32-

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The Other Victoria: The Princess Royal and the Great Game of Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Princess Victoria's Family Tree xiv
  • Prince Frederick William's Family Tree xvi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Minuet Before A Wedding 5
  • Chapter Two - Adieu to England 32
  • Chapter Three - Divided Loyalty 49
  • Chapter Four - Besieged by Bismarck 65
  • Chapter Five - To Us Germans 89
  • Chapter Six - To Win, to Lose 103
  • Chapter Seven - Waiting on Ceremony 127
  • Chapter Eight - Empire 139
  • Chapter Nine - How Long, O Lord, How Long? 161
  • Chapter Ten - Anguish and Omens 179
  • Chapter Eleven - At the Throat 193
  • Chapter Twelve - The Short Reign 208
  • Chapter Thirteen - Old Scores, New Places 223
  • Chapter Fourteen - Retirement and Requiem 238
  • Source Notes 249
  • Select Bibliograpby 265
  • Index 269
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